2) The Media
In 1972, an episode of Maude concluded with the central character choosing to have an abortion. One would think that nearly forty years later, we would be past this debate. Not so. In fact, filmmakers and television writers have discovered that fictional abortion not only kills a fetus, but kills a story as well. Movie and television characters who wrestle with the decision (Dr. Abby Lockhart on ER, for example) almost always choose life.

That's why even pro-choice filmmakers choose life in the end. Juno is a good example. The pregnant teenage girl approaches an abortion clinic and meets a pro-life friend who informs her that the baby has a heartbeat, can feel pain, and already has fingernails. Juno chooses "to appreciate her miracle."

Similarly, in a 2009 episode of Law and Order ("Dignity"), a female attorney seeking justice for a murdered abortion doctor is shaken by a description of partial-birth abortion. "I grew up thinking Roe v. Wade was gospel," she says. Now, "I don't know where my freedom ends and the dignity of another being begins."

The media is not leading the way when it comes to the pro-life cause. It's only catching up to the sweeping pro-life sentiments of the majority of Americans. Yet the shift in popular culture reflects the progress the pro-life argument has made.

3) Young People
Sixteen-year-old singing sensation, Justin Bieber, was recently asked by Rolling Stone for his position on abortion: "I really don't believe in abortion," he said, since abortion is "like killing a baby." Bieber is not alone. The sea of young faces at this year's annual "March for Life" in Washington prompted NARAL (National Abortion Rights Action League) President Nancy Keenan to worry: "There are so many of them, and they are so young."

Bieber, ironically enough, was castigated by Barbara Walters for answering questions inappropriate for a person of his age -- even though girls can actually receive abortions, and not merely opine on them, at ages younger than 16. That a veteran journalist like Walters fails to see the inconsistency in her position is a testament to how entrenched are the ideas among the older generation of abortion advocates.

4) The Third Wave
John Ensor of Heartbeat International writes: "In the first wave, Catholics took the lead is declaring the inherent evil of abortion. Evangelicals then flooded in to help advance the pregnancy help movement. The Third Wave points to the victory of our movement and the downfall of abortion as a business, when Black and Hispanic Christians not only join this movement, but lead it."

A few months ago, a billboard in New York City featured a picture of an African-American girl with the message "The most dangerous place for an African-American is in the womb." Many found the ad "racist" and thought it condemned black women for having abortions. Lost in the controversy was the actual point of the advertisement: abortion clinics target poor minorities in the inner city. Although the billboard was taken down, it pointed to the troubling racial history of abortion. When YouTube videos began making the rounds, showing the overtly racist agenda of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, some pro-choice advocates were forced to reconsider their assumptions.