Furthermore, simply because Protestant churches may not completely share the Catholic position this time around, does not mean that they will manage to avoid jeopardy at some point in the future. Presidents come and go, but precedents are forever—unless the Supreme Court reverses them—and religious leaders everywhere would do well to remember that. What would the same progressive Protestants argue if some future administration reinstituted the draft and eliminated conscientious objector status?

Perhaps Protestant leaders should be asking themselves the same question Thomas More asks Roper, his anarchist, would-be son-in-law, in Robert Bolt's play, A Man for All Seasons, "[W]here would you hide . . . the laws all being flat?"

So, is there any other reason that progressive Protestants aren't more actively engaged? Yes, there is one: We don't have any language for the presenting issues of contraception, choice, and abortion, except for the political vocabulary that we've been using all along. So, while the administration has run a coach and horses through the First Amendment, we find it hard to explain why that might be a problem, because we are convinced that what the administration just did was strike a blow for what is not just politically, but theologically appropriate.

Shame on us. The right to choose, control over our bodies, and access to treatment are all political issues--and they have a place in the conversation.

But in using that language alone, we have neglected the hard theological work that is properly the church's task. From the theological point of view the stewardship of the bodies that God has given us, being made in the image of God, giving birth to those made in the image of God, chastity, the sacrament of marriage, and the purpose of life are all in play as well. How those values are honored in a complex world is the stuff of Christian conviction and practice.

Progressive Christians who are dead sure that the Catholic bishops have conflated church and state should remove the beam in their own eyes before reaching for the microscope to help others. Far too often Protestants have bought the so-called Erastian notion that the church is subordinate to the state and that faith, therefore, is a private affair. Now we are in danger of taking those notions to their logical, self-destructive conclusion: The only theological vocabulary we have is the vocabulary that the state gives us.

If we go much further down this road, there will be little reason to worry about precedents, because there won't be a church with a distinctive ecclesial voice worth protecting. When that happens, forget the applause. Cue the funeral dirge.