Georges de La Tour’s “Magdalen,” 1640

 

Last week's column discussed how we might cut through the hype surrounding 2012 and come to a more meaningful perspective on the topic. I concluded it had to do with a shift in consciousness, but what might this mean and how can we recognize it?

The whole idea of 2012 has no meaning unless we can interpret it through the lens of our personal experience. What does 2012 mean to you? Can you trace the course of your life leading up to this point and identify the flowering of something new, something that made a difference for you or in you? Chances are that if you have this clarity, you'll find commonality with other people's experiences, and this just might be what people are calling the new consciousness of 2012.

My Story

Let me give you the example of my story, and perhaps this will help you recognize how you might relate your own experience to wider events. I started my personal spiritual odyssey after having some vivid experiences in the 1970s. I discovered I was an accurate medical intuitive, experienced remote viewing, clairvoyance, clairaudience, and psychometry among other things. In the '70s, I travelled the world as an international businessman in somewhat of a limbo between my corporate left-brain life and my growing intuitive right-brained metaphysical life.

By 1999, I had the idea to write a story in an effort to understand all of the psychic and intuitive experiences I had undergone. It was going to be a story about how spirit first came to exist in the material world. I was prompted to study ancient spiritual traditions as research for the book, and as a way for my Capricorn mind to understand the basis for all the intuitive information I was receiving from another source.

Enter Magdalene and The Da Vinci Code

Something also told me that Mary Magdalene was to be a central part of this story. Odd, because I knew nothing at all about Mary Magdalene, and it seemed no one else did either at the turn of the new century. I searched everywhere and found scant information about Magdalene, only enough to sense a great mystery behind this figure portrayed in the Bible in a way that begs you to ask, why is she even mentioned? I sensed she was like a teaser ad for a much bigger, unrevealed story.

Owing to a lack of historical information, I began to channel a story involving Magdalene. My primary work was still international luxury hotel development right up through 2009, so I researched and wrote the book in fragmentary scenes on long plane rides, which is why it took a decade to complete the book.

Many told me I was crazy to pick this obscure figure and write a story that smacked of religious controversy if I ever wanted to have a successful novel. But two startling streams converged in my journey halfway into the decade of 2000. First there was an explosion of information, books, and articles on Magdalene, almost as if the air had become charged with Magdalene particles.

Around this time I met Dan Brown just after The Da Vinci Code was published. Dan's portrayal of Magdalene was superficial, but he popularized her name and hinted at the suppressed alternative biblical story I had described in my manuscript. In a way, he had laid the paving stone for Magdalene awareness that I would explore in more depth.

Secondly, I came across the Gnostic gospels, a suppressed body of work by the earliest of Christian mystics. And lo and behold, the star disciple portrayed in these works was not St. Peter, but Mary Magdalene.

In fact, Jesus proclaims Magdalene to be his other half in the gospels, not in the physical sense as in The Da Vinci Code, but in the spiritual sense representing the yin/yang polarity of the universe. Many original Christians actually held Magdalene to be the embodiment of the Holy Spirit, the female aspect of God, just as Jesus embodied the Christ spirit, the male aspect of God.

Next week I'll speak about the revelations I had after studying the Gnostic gospels.