John Stott on Conclusions that Count in Sermons

John Stott was a master of preaching. Here is what he believes on preaching for a response. You can read more here.

John Stott, Photo by Corey Widmer“The conclusion should not merely recapitulate your sermon—it should apply it. Obviously, you should be applying all along, but you should keep something for the end which will prevail upon your people to take action. “No summons, no sermon.” Preach through the head to the heart (i.e. the will). The goal of the sermon should be to “storm the citadel of the will and capture it for Jesus Christ. What do you want them to do? Employ a variety of methods to do this:
  1. Argument—anticipate objections and refute them.

  2. Admonition— warn of the consequences of disobedience.
  3. Indirect Conviction—arouse moral indignation and then turn it on them (Nathan with David).
  4. Pleading—apply the gentle pressure of God’s love, concern for their well-being, and the needs of others.
  5. Vision—paint a picture of what is possible through obedience to God in this area.”

About Adrian Warnock

Adrian Warnock has been a blogger since April 2003, and a member of Jubilee Church, London since 1995, where he seves as part of the leadership team alongside Tope Koleoso.

Together they have written Hope Reborn - How to Become a Christian and Live for Jesus, published by Christian Focus.

Adrian is also the author of Raised With Christ - How The Resurrection Changes Everything, published by Crossway.

Read more about Adrian Warnock or connect with him on Twitter, Facebook or Google+.

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