Loop of Brighid: Invocation of the Graces – A Brigidine Sacred Text, Part 3

Joan of Arc, 1865, by John Everett Millais (1829-1896)

The power of the “Invocation of the Graces” to grant victory over one’s enemies should not be seen as something given in addition to the feminine charms listed in the first verse, but because of them. The word buaidh, after all, means “victory.” When Brighid bathes your palms and cheeks in Her “lustral fire,” in Her milk and sunlight, in Her honey and wine, She not only grants you Her beauty and elegance but makes you “more victorious than all persons.” [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Invocation of the Graces – A Brigidine Sacred Text, Part 2

Frederick Sandys (1829-1904), Gentle Spring, 1865

The “Invocation” is not only a piece of folk magic but a commentary on virtue ethics. Many systems of virtue ethics seem to come from a very masculine perspective. For instance, the “nine noble virtues” of Asatru are courage, truth, honor, fidelity, discipline, hospitality, industriousness, self-reliance and perseverance. These are not portrayed as being “just for men,” but their relationship to the masculine warrior ethos of the Icelandic sagas is clear. As a discussion of “virtue ethics” based on a distinctly feminine perspective, the “Invocation of the Graces” provides an interesting contrast to the nine noble virtues. [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Invocation of the Graces – A Brigidine Sacred Text, Part 1

Anne-François-Louis Janmot (1814–1892), Poème de l'âme - Sur la Montagne (On The Mountain)

The “Invocation of the Graces” is a charm or blessing that was recited over young people in the Scottish Highlands to protect them from various potential threats while endowing them with a number of virtues or powers Carmichael’s translation refers to as “graces.” [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Private Practices 6 – The Seven Elements

The Sleeping Earth and Wakening Moon, Evelyn de Morgan (1855-1919)

There is an interesting gloss on the story of Conlai in the Senchus Mor, to the effect that the druids claimed to have created the earth, sea, sun and moon. If druidic practice contained rituals dramatizing the creation of the world and the elements, this could be seen as a similar concept to theurgy, henosis or deity yoga. [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Private Practices 5 – The Manor of Tara

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953), The Bride, 1912

Turn toward the east again to gaze up at the Sky, the upper realm of Celtic myth. Feel the power of the Brig coursing through you from up above, flowing through your body and into the Land. The spot where you are standing is the sacred center, the place of the Sovereignty. [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Private Practices 4 – The Four Treasures

Sidney Sime ~ The City of Never (1912)

In the fourth of this series on private practices, we’re going to visualize the four Cities of Heaven and the four treasures, with Brighid as the sun of heaven imparting Her power to them all. Unlike the three sisters visualization, this version of Brighid is not in human form. In Her role as a blazing sun above the heavenly cities, She embodies the Brig, the transcendent power of all creation. [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Private Practices 3 – The Three Sisters

Gaetano Previati, The Dance (1908)

In Celtic Christianity, it is said that prayer should be continued “until tears come.” Not everyone can cry so easily, but that isn’t a bad guideline for a devotional ritual. [Read more...]


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