What’s New at Patheos Pagan (July 2013)

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New blogs and columns at Patheos Pagan! Syncretic Pagan theology, Pagans and interfaith, Jungian Paganism, reconstructionist mysticism, domestic spirituality, and more. [Read more...]

Druid Thoughts: What Do Gods Look Like?

The Assembly of the Gods, Jacopo Zucchi (1541–1590)

Most of our representations of deity seem to look suspiciously like us. The Bible has that line about us being made in God’s image, but I think really it’s the other way round – we make Gods in our image. [Read more...]

The Busy Witch: Midsummer Traditions

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For me, the summer solstice has always been closely linked with the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Fairies! Lovers! Parties! From start to finish, this play is one giant romp, and that’s the kind of energy I want to cultivate in the summer — starting with making offerings to the fairies. [Read more...]

Seekers and Guides: The Three Degrees of Wicca

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The three degrees of initiatory Witchcraft are often misunderstood by Witches and Pagans, especially those who do not study in an initiatory tradition. Sable Aradia explains what they are all about and why they would matter. [Read more...]

Syncretic Electric: Figuring Out the Rules

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Julian Betkowski introduces his new column “Syncretic Electric” and his path, Neoclassical Syncretism. [Read more...]

Loop of Brighid: Invocation of the Graces – A Brigidine Sacred Text, Part 1

Anne-François-Louis Janmot (1814–1892), Poème de l'âme - Sur la Montagne (On The Mountain)

The “Invocation of the Graces” is a charm or blessing that was recited over young people in the Scottish Highlands to protect them from various potential threats while endowing them with a number of virtues or powers Carmichael’s translation refers to as “graces.” [Read more...]

Hills of the Horizon: An Introduction

The Egyptian twin-lion god Aker, with the hieroglyph for the horizon on his backs.

The concept of the horizon is one that is threaded through huge amounts of Egyptian liturgical poetry. It appears in the oldest known texts, often in a context that seems to equate it with the spirit world. The gods are seen going to, dwelling within, and rising from the horizon; the king, likewise; those who enter the spirit world are “pure and living in the horizon.” [Read more...]


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