Pagans and Christians and Mark, Part I

Some people ask whether one can be both Pagan and Christian. If you think of Jesus as the Lord of Glory living somewhere up in Heaven who has a rule against belonging to any other faith, and if you define “Pagan” as meaning merely “non-Christian,” then, no, they could not overlap. However, there are Christopagans who manage it, by not defining the terms as being mutually exclusive. The inquiry has to begin with trying to understand Jesus the Nazarene—Rabbi Yeshua ha-Notsri—as an historical human being, and so must begin with the Gospel According to Mark. [Read more…]

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Interpreting the “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife”

There have been many news stories reporting that the “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife” is as old as the other Coptic documents published as the Nag Hammadi Library in English. It now can be taken seriously as an historical document. The only new element in it is the words “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife . . . ‘” This concept is, of course, shocking to people who have never read anything but the four canonical gospels. [Read more…]

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Why Is Sex a Problem at All? The Poison of Puritanism

Why don’t human beings just have sex whenever they feel like it—which is usually—just for the pleasure of it? (It is Sunday morning. I did not listen to a sermon. As you can see, I instead wrote one—or, at least, a Pagan equivalent.) [Read more…]

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Retrieving the Myth of Jesus and Sophia, Part I

In various previous blogs I have been pursuing the myth of Jesus and Sophia. I think of that myth as a palimpsest over the historical Joshua and Miriam, one that encoded the theology of the Marianite Christians, the name I am giving to the community in Alexandria that I think was founded by Mary Magdalene [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 26: The Sermon to the Prostitutes

XXVIII. The Sermon to the Prostitutes  As Aradia was speaking, a young woman in the crowd, a prostitute named Diana, pushed her way forward, wearing only a linen cloth about her body. The other women tried to hold her back; but she left the linen cloth in their hands and came to Aradia naked. Aradia [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 24: Aradia Enters, Stage Center

XXVI. The Beginning of the Book of the Generation of Aradia [From the Gospel of Diana, as translated by A. Verrazano and A. Peregrino] I am Diana, the daughter of Aradia.  Aradia was Queen of all the Witches and taught them magic in the school of her mother, the God­dess Diana. She named her daughter [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 22: Conclusion of The Acts of Mary

XXIV.  Mary Brings the Good News to Gaul [Excerpts from The Acts of Mary as translated by C.T. Edwards, A. Healy, L. Moresco, and S. Weiss] We were fortunate for several years in our teaching of the good news to Jews and Greeks alike. Then some of the House of Shammai who had escaped to [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 20: The Flight to Egypt

[An excerpt from The Acts of Mary, as translated by C.T. Edwards, A. Healy, L. Moresco, and S. Weiss] XXII. After the council meeting, the brothers who preached to the Gentiles continued on their way. We continued on with ours, confident that we were keeping the mysteries he had taught us, no matter what the [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 16: The Preaching of Mary

XVIII. From the Acts of Mary [An excerpt from The Acts of Mary as translated byC.T. Edwards,  A. Healey,  L. Moresco, and S. Weiss] Chapter V.  On one day a man in the crowd called out to me, “What about divorce? Did your Mashiach allow divorce?” I replied, “Why do you ask about divorce? Why [Read More…]

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Goddess Murder, 13: The Other Two Gospels

XV. The Work Continues, 4   As the caterpillar chooses the fairest leaves to lay her eggs on, so the priest lays his curse on the fairest joys. William Blake “Seamus, what can you tell us about this Gaelic gospel?” I asked. “It is a translation of a gospel originally composed in Greek,” Seamus replied. [Read More…]

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