The Greening of Paganism, Part 2

There is a presumption among many Pagans that Paganism is and always has been a “green” religion. In fact, Oberon Zell has called it “the Green Party at prayer.” But Paganism, like every religion, is a complex mixture of concepts and practices that can be used to either rationalize environmental neglect or encourage ecological harmony. Rather than characterizing Paganism, or any other religion, as “green” or “not green,” we might rather speak about the “greening of Paganism,” an ongoing, never-to-be-complete process. [Read more…]

The Greening of Paganism, Part 1

There is a presumption among many Pagans that Paganism is and always has been a “green” religion. In fact, Oberon Zell has called it “the Green Party at prayer.” But Paganism, like every religion, is a complex mixture of concepts and practices that can be used to either rationalize environmental neglect or encourage ecological harmony. Rather than characterizing Paganism, or any other religion, as “green” or “not green,” we might rather speak about the “greening of Paganism,” an ongoing, never-to-be-complete process. [Read more…]

Countdown to Earth Day 2016: #9 Ground Your Rituals

One thing you can do to honor the Earth this Earth Day is to help reground our Pagan rituals. Let’s begin by asking the hard questions: Do our rituals help us experience the natural world or do they actually cut us off from it? Do our circles connect us to others or cut us off from the rest of the world? Is our Paganism too inwardly-focused? Is our connection to the “elements” just in our heads? Is our magic just another attempt to achieve mastery over the natural world? How “earth-centered” is our Paganism really? [Read more…]

Why “Pagan”? – An Atheist Pagan’s Response to a Theist

Why do we call ourselves “Pagan”? Why not just call ourselves atheists or humanists? What does the “Pagan” label add to our identity? [Read more…]

Branches of the Deep Ecology Tree: Nature Religion: Reuniting religion and nature

Nature religionists perceive nature as both sacred and interconnected. By “sacred”, we mean that nature has intrinsic value apart from its utility as a resource for human beings. By “interconnected”, we mean that our very being is determined by our ecology, by the material and cultural environment which we share with all other living beings. We are immersed in a web of life which is our true community. [Read more…]

Branches of the Deep Ecology Tree: The Gaia Theory: Reuniting our bodies and nature

The Gaia Theory calls into question many deeply ingrained scientific and cultural assumptions and challenges us to perceive our world in a new way. The Gaia Theory also illustrates how we are radically interconnected with all other livings beings on the planet, human and other, as well as with the non-living elements of the Earth. We humans carry on our lives seemingly independently of Gaia, but yet we exist within a larger living entity on which we depend for our lives. [Read more…]


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