Can “God” be Castrated?

When we say that a historically male-gendered term is genderless, there is the risk that all we are really doing is normatizing masculinity, i.e., reinforcing maleness as the standard by which all other genders are judged. But while “God” is gendered in most Abrahamic discourse today, that can change … and Pagans can help it change. The word “God” doesn’t have to be gendered, and certainly doesn’t have to be male-gendered. [Read more…]

Is There a Place for God in Paganism?

Choosing to say “God” instead of “Goddess” allows us to speak about divinity separately from gender, while also allowing us to tap into all the power and possibility that has been associated with that word for centuries. I’m not suggesting we choose one over the other. I’m suggesting we embrace all of these words: “gods”, “goddesses”, “Goddess”, and even “God”, each of them with their unique potential and their unique limitations. We Pagans know something about the infinite diversity of the divine, and we need all of the linguistic resources at our disposal to express it. So let us reclaim “God” from the monotheists and the patriarchs. Let us make “God” Pagan again. [Read more…]

There’s being Earth-centered, and then there’s being earth-centered: why both are important

I recently made two attempts to explain why I think why our subjective experience should be given as much importance in our discourse as our attempts to bracket that subjectivity in favor of the ideal of scientific objectivity.  This discussion was framed in terms of the relative value of geo-centric and helio-centric perspectives on the [Read More…]


I little while ago, I came across this guest post by Molly Remer at Feminism and Religion on theapoetics.  Molly blogs at on theaology and theapoetics.  Molly describes theapoetics as a three-step process: “Drawing directly from David Miller’s (a student of Hopper) three-fold conception of “theopoiesis,” I offer this similar three-fold understanding of theapoetics: [Read More…]