Buddha’s advice on wilderness and living in the present moment in nature

“The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; and what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation of the world.” - Henry David Thoreau, "Walking" (emphasis added) In this sentiment, Thoreau, who was influenced by the Indian philosophy trickling into the Euro-American mindset of his time, echoes the Buddha's words about life in the forest (Pali arañña). Much scholarly ink has been spilled on Buddhism and the environment. An excellent starting point here … [Read more...]

The Souse Family and Buddhism’s Fifth Precept

A guest post by Daniel D. Woo (© 2016) I once thought that I had very few indelible childhood memories in the first 4 years of my life and that what little I remembered had no impact on my life. Then I remembered learning from infancy three songs:The Kuomintang (Chinese Nationalists) Republic of China (ROC) National Anthem The US Army Aircorp The drinking song “Glorious”The ROC anthem’s translated lyrics are: “San Min Chu-i,Our aim shall be:To found a free land,World pe … [Read more...]

Buddhist Ethics has a good day: on Philosophy, East and West

Almost 3 years ago exactly, 3 AM Magazine interviewed Jay Garfield, one of the best-known Buddhist philosophers in academia today. I wrote about that interview and still look back fondly on the comments and conversations that ensued.So it was with great joy that I saw 3 AM Magazine's latest interview with a Buddhist philosopher: Nicolas Bommarito, who teaches at NYU and the University of Buffalo. It was a great reminder that great thought within the academy is still being devoted to Buddhist … [Read more...]

A “Very Buddhist” take on The Story of God: Apocalypse

I have been fascinated by religion and its associated mythologies, philosophies, and practices for well over half of my life now. I was raised Catholic, but a very liberal Catholic, and when - around the age of 12 or 13 - I was given the choice of going to Church or not, I chose not. Fast forward a few years, and I created a very small community of non-believers, dubbed the "Helena Heretics." I think I still have an unused email address at yahoo with that name. Then I expanded out to "Montana F … [Read more...]

Mindfulness and Self-Care: Why Should I Care?

A guest post by Edwin Ng with Ron PurserEditor's note: this is the second in a two-part series by Edwin Ng and Ron Purser, part one can be found at the Huffington Post here.Part One considered the current hype surrounding workplace mindfulness against the dubious history of management science. Part Two here considers the use of critical mindfulness in experiments with ethical self-care.Though we are skeptical about celebratory claims, we actually do hope that mindfulness might bec … [Read more...]

Mutuality at the Limits of Race – A Buddhist Perspective

A guest post by Doshin Nathan Woods “A Black Man is a person who must ride ‘Jim Crow’ in Georgia…”--W.E.B Du Bois As I walked to the Zendo the helicopters droned distantly overhead.  The muffled announcement reverberating through the neighborhood: “White or Hispanic male….wearing a white t-shirt…..”  Indistinct, my attention turned to the matter at hand, where, upon stepping into the Zendo, I was about my business:  “Hi, excuse me, sorry to interrupt, but the Zendo is closed right now, woul … [Read more...]

Buddhism, Politics, and the 2016 US Presidential Race

As I mentioned last month, a Pew Survey found that Buddhists in the US are around 16% Republican (or leaning), 69% Democrat, and 16%  Independent or other. That is from a 2014 Religious Landscape Study. So we sought to update that here at American Buddhist Perspectives, creating a simple poll that drew in over 350 responses.The data gathered (also here and here) and discussions following went even further, leading to the plan of regular (monthly) polls. This gives us opportunities to measure … [Read more...]

Mindfulness, Buddhism, and Philosophy, for the love of language, and the limits of language

One of the highlights of the recent Mindfulness, MOOCs, and Money in Higher Education conference at Naropa University (March 18-21) was a small break-out session led by Carrie Bergman of The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society. We were joined by two Naropa faculty, Susan Burggraf and Cynthia Kneen (who co-founded Naropa and happens to be a classically trained clown), an undergraduate independent scholar from Amherst College named Vivian Mac, and James Rhem, Executive Director of the Nat … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X