Among the Sangha: An African American Buddhist in the Zendo

Today I am again honored to share another wonderful guest post in our ongoing series of expanding perspectives on race and diversity in American Buddhism. Recent posts include yesterday’s "Crossing the Great Divides in U.S. Buddhism" by Mushim (Patricia) Ikeda, Wednesday's (forthcoming) book excerpt from Lama Choyin Rangdrol, “African American Buddhism…” an interview discussing emerging voices in the Western Buddhist world, the Tibetan Feminist Collective, and two excellent academic pieces that s … [Read more...]

Buddhist Teacher Thich Nhat Hanh returns to Plum Village after US treatment

Thich Nhat Hanh (Thay) has returned to his adoptive home monastery in southern France after six month in the United States to receive specialist care after his stroke in November 2014. As written in an update today by the Monks and Nuns of Plum Village: Since the dawn of the New Year, Thay has very clearly communicated to us a wish to return to his hermitage in Plum Village, France. Thay is satisfied with the progress he has made so far, thanks to the phenomenal care and attention of the … [Read more...]

Buddha in the Classroom: A little Zen for the Workplace

Subtitled: “Zen Wisdom to Inspire Teachers,” this is a book filled with much more than just “Zen” wisdom and it will surely inspire pretty much anyone who reads it. “The Burned-Out Professor.” To be fair, some of my appreciation for the book is purely selfish: the book feels like it was written specifically for me. The author, Donna Quesada, is a philosophy professor in California, a Buddhist, a yoga instructor, a connoisseur of world-wisdom, and a watcher of a good movies. She tells us t … [Read more...]

Thich Nhat Hanh on an autumn leaf: life, death, continuation

Thich Nhat Hanh is revered as one of Buddhism's greatest living masters: a poet, a translator, a peace activist, and most importantly to most: a teacher of profound depth and meaning to tens of thousands of followers around the world. It has been over a month since our last health update, and given the trajectory over the last 11 month, it seems that cautious optimism is still warranted.Yet, even as his health continues to improve, his followers have been faced with the question of … [Read more...]

Žižek points us to the dark side of Buddhism, again

This week The Guardian published a selection of short essays titled, "I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons." The newspaper deserves great praise for bringing together a wonderful variety of philosophers to draw our attention to the moral and epistemological issues in films. Greats like Julian Baggini, who I had the fortune of seeing with Owen Flanagan and Tim Lott last spring (video), Christine Korsgaard, an exemplary Kant scholar and philosopher in her own r … [Read more...]

Book Review: “The Way of Tenderness: Awakening Through Race, Sexuality, and Gender”

THIS IS A BOOK THAT CAN TEACH US ALL.These words grace the back cover of The Way of Tenderness: Awakening Through Race, Sexuality and Gender.And Tanya McGinnity of Full Contact Enlightenment put it equally well when she wrote:"This book by Zenju Earthlyn Manuel is essential reading for all Buddhists. Essential."Both statements are absolutely true.As are the several lines of advanced praise in the book's opening pages, from American Buddhist greats including Jan Willis, author … [Read more...]

“Why am I here?” – a post-event interview with veteran journalist and university teacher, Eileen Flynn

Wrapping up what has been an unexpectedly interview-filled month here at American Buddhist Perspectives, I am pleased to present Eileen Flynn, who co-moderated last week’s interfaith panel on the topic of “why am I here?” Video from the event should be up at Deily.org on March 1st.  My hope is that between this interview and the earlier one with Rev. Dr. David Zuniga, more people will go see the video and feel encouraged to start conversations like this in their own communities.  So, getting … [Read more...]

“Why am I here?” – an interview with Zen priest and interfaith dialogue participant, Rev. Dr. David Zuniga

Last week I caught wind of an event with a very intriguing title "Why Am I Here? An Austin Interfaith Dialogue" and an even more interesting set of speakers representing Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Zen Buddhism. Very happily, I was able to get in touch with Rev. Dr. David Zuniga, who will represent Zen in the discussion and arranged an interview on the topic.I sat down (via email) over the weekend to discuss the upcoming event:First, thank you for taking the time to do this, David. … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X