The Future of Evangelicalism Online

From an important post from Patheos Director of Content, Timothy Dalrymple, in which he envisions the future of the Evangelical Portal at Patheos:

Evangelicals are neither loved nor respected in the American public square.   This is due in part to our enduring and principled commitment to truths and values the rest of mainstream society rejects, and in part to a tendency in media and academia to present a caricature of evangelicalism that elides its virtues and exaggerates its vices.  But it’s also due in part — in large part, we must confess — to a thoroughgoing failure amongst evangelicals to represent themselves, their views, and their vision of the Christian life in a manner that’s intellectually compelling, meticulously informed, and suffused with charity and grace.

What has long been lacking is a kind of Op Ed Page for evangelical America, a gathering place for the best evangelical public intellectuals to reflect on matters of common concern.  Younger generations of evangelical writers can be identified, cultivated and projected into the most important conversations of the day.  Where Catholicism has organs such as First Things and a longstanding tradition of thoughtful reflection on policy and society, evangelicalism has neither.  It should have both.  And if our intentions for the Evangelical Channel at Patheos are realized, it will have both.

The time has come to re-envision the Evangelical Channel at Patheos: what it can become, what it should become, and how we can get it there.

Read the whole post here:

 

  • Diogenes Carton

    Dalrymple writes:
    Evangelicals are neither loved nor respected in the American public square. This is due in part to our enduring and principled commitment to truths and values the rest of mainstream society rejects, and in part to a tendency in media and academia to present a caricature of evangelicalism that elides its virtues and exaggerates its vices.
    This is total nonsense.

    Evangelicals are disliked (think I) primarily for their *style*–their manner, the obnoxious way they press their case, ignoring or distorting evidence they do not like, making personal attacks on those who disagree with them, and so on. It has very little to do with media or academe.

  • Diogenes Carton

    I should have added some examples of obnoxiousness or dishonesty by evangelicals.

    A great expl is the nonsense evangelicals spout about “America founded as a Christian nation”, when in fact there is not a single reference to Jesus in the key founding documents; when an important 1791 document (Treaty of Tripoli) explicitly refutes that idea, when the Constitution contains that clause that evangelicals hate, about “no religious test for office”, and so on.

    Similarly, evangelicals (et al) talk about “our god-given rights”. UMM…like the right to blaspheme (Amendment 1)? Like the right to a trial by peers? Like the right to self-government?

    Evangelicals would be much better liked and respected if they behaved in a manner that was respectful of others, instead of insisting on their own facts, and that anyone who disagrees with them is wrong (at best) or downright evil (at worst).


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