How does God still speak?

sacred borders

Until recent decades at least, nearly all Americans have believed in an unchanging God, “the same yesterday, today and forever.” If God does not change, does God’s manner and rate of revelation change over time? Typically, those who have wrestled with the issue of canon in the history of American religion have made only crude [Read More...]

The Rise of Liberal Religion

13687246

I’ve recently cracked open Matthew Hedstrom’s recently published The Rise of Liberal Religion. Hedstrom’s book is providing me with an opportunity to reconfigure my thinking and teaching on the respective trajectories of twentieth-century (and beyond) Protestant liberalism and evangelicalism. In recent decades pundits and some scholars have made much of the post-WWII evangelical resurgence, coupled [Read More...]

Religion behind the Iron Curtain

Father Szaléz Kiss

Although one could find fuller treatments of the subject elsewhere, I was very intrigued by Anne Applebaum’s thoughtful treatment of religion in Eastern Europe in the first decade after the end of WWII. [See the first part of this review of Applebaum's The Iron Curtain here]. First of all, Applebaum allows for a healthy measure [Read More...]

The Baptism of Early Virginia

Over at Religion in American History, our friends have posted a fascinating interview with Rebecca Goetz, author of the recently published The Baptism of Early Virginia (Johns Hopkins University Press). A few highlights: – On in importance of religion for understanding race in early American history: This was the early 2000s, so race, class, and [Read More...]

Luther, Cranach, and Me

cranach altar

I became a historian through the Bible and the Reformation. For starters, at a certain point in my youth, reading the historical books of the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Joshua through Esther) and the Gospels plus Acts was my way of making church services pass by more quickly. The narratives about the past were usually considerably [Read More...]

Being a Historian

Being a Historian

James Banner’s Being a Historian: An Introduction to the Professional World of History should be required reading for every first-year student enrolled in a history graduate program.  There is no other book like it. Banner is a history veteran.  He taught at Princeton from 1966 to 1980 and then left to start the American Association [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X