Have You Seen God Loves Uganda?

I have not, but I really want to. Especially after some recent comments made on a Mormon blog about the treatment of gays in Uganda (those comments are addressed here).

God Loves Uganda tells the story of the evangelical anti-homosexual movement in Uganda.

Last night, Roger Ross Williams, the director and producer of the documentary, talked with Jon Stewart on the Daily Show.

Take a look:

 

Here is a synopsis of the film from filmmakers:

As an American-influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the conflicting motives of faith and greed, ecstasy and egotism, among Ugandan ministers, American evangelical leaders and the foot soldiers of a theology that sees Uganda as ground zero in a battle for billions of souls.

Through verité, interviews, and hidden camera footage – and with unprecedented access – God Loves Uganda takes viewers inside the evangelical movement in both the US and Uganda.

It offers a portrait of Lou Engle, creator of The Call, a public event that brings tens of thousands of believers together to pray against sexual sin. It provides a rare view of the most powerful evangelical minister in Uganda, who lives in a mansion where he’s served by a white-coated chef. It goes into a Ugandan church where a preacher whips a congregation into mass hysteria with anti-gay rhetoric.

God Loves Uganda records the culture clash between enthusiastic Midwestern missionaries and world weary Ugandans. It features a heartbreaking interview with gay activist David Kato shortly before he was murdered. It tells the moving story of Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, a minister excommunicated, ostracized and literally spat on for being tolerant – and chronicles his remarkable campaign for peace and healing in Uganda.

Shocking, horrifying, touching and enlightening, God Loves Uganda will make you question what you thought you knew about religion.

Does this sound familiar at all? We must stand for the memory of heroes like David Kato. While reasonable people can disagree about many things, they also must agree and unite against hate and brutality.

About Chris Henrichsen

Chris Henrichsen has moved Approaching Justice off of Patheos. Find his latest posts and the new Approaching Justice. Thanks!


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