What lurks at the bottom of your garden? {Yeats, faeries, and the Irish occult tradition}

Ireland is a land awash in folklore.  Like waves crashing upon its shores, the stories create a rhythmic backdrop for life. They seep into the fabric of Being and are part of the island’s DNA.  I return to Ireland in two weeks–in time to weave my Imbolc solar crosses. With returning on my mind, I share this juicy tidbit from R. F. Foster:

Faeries in a mountain cavern : Æ : image Lissadell House

Foster was born in Waterford and educated in both Ireland and the United States. A graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, he subsequently became Professor of Modern British History at Birkbeck College, University of London and in 1991 the first Carroll Professor of Irish History at Oxford and a Fellow of Hertford College. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1989, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 1986, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1992, an honorary Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2010.  His books include W.B. Yeats, A Life. I: The Apprentice Mage 1865-1914 (1997) which won the 1998 James Tait Black Prize for biography, and Volume II: The Arch-Poet, 1915-1939 (2003). He is also a well-known critic and broadcaster.

R F Foster on Yeats, faeries, and the Irish occult tradition

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About Traci

Traci Laird is an animist living in Ireland and hails from the great state of Texas (a mythic heritage she is quite proud of!).  Her current academic pursuits are in Sociology and Psychology, and she engages a “sensuous scholarship” when seeking to understand Place.  She can also be found at Confessions of a Hedge Witch


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