About Elinor Prędota

Elinor Predota was born in London in 1970, and was raised in England’s second city. Her hippy parents took her on endless, wonderful visits to birdwatching hides, Iron Age hill forts, Medieval Castles and ancient stone circles across Britain, which kindled her longing for green hills. She finally moved to the country in the year 2000, where the land has taught her more magic than any book or human being ever could. She is a priestess, a poet, a scholar, an accidental comedian, and lives in southern Scotland with her partner, a very big dog, and a vast range of more-than-human neighbours. She can also be found online at elinorpredota.com.

Remembering the never born: claiming a sibling as an Ancestor

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As part of preparing for October's blogging about Ancestor remembrance, I had a long chat with my blogging partner for the project, the very lovely Reba Riley, who blogs on the Progressive Christian Channel at Post-Traumatic Church Syndrome. We found that we have a lot in common, from our shared interest in universal, heart aspects of spirituality, to some 'coincidences' in our personal histories and circumstances.My personal Ancestor remembranceWhen I was explaining to Reba how I … [Read more...]

When the heather blooms: the end of summer

Heather (Calluna vulgaris) by John Haslam

August is a difficult month for me. I can't write about it while it's happening. It's still summer, but the tang of autumn starts to flavour the air. The sun's power wanes, the days get shorter, even as its rays are still warm and feel strong.I love spring; I love summer; I love autumn; I love winter. But the liminal times between them, the transitional times -- April, August, November, February -- create a disturbing, confusing experience for me.Partly, that's due to the effects of S … [Read more...]

Know your wild herbs: A is for Angelica

Angelica in bloom, surrounded by rose bay willow herb (fire weed) and with fields and hills in the background.

AKA plants I meet while walking my dog.Throughout this summer, I've noticed what a vast range of medicinally, magically, and otherwise useful herbs grow all around the place, here in the valley where I live. The diversity of plant life is one of the things that helps me to feel that yes, this is indeed home. It's one of the things I most miss when I'm away, or during the winter months.So I've decided to introduce you to some of my vegetable neighbours by way of an A-to-Z.A is for … [Read more...]

When water is cut off: from Cochabamba to Detroit, by way of my bathroom

Spring water catch box

In the mid-1990s, the water services of Cochabamba, a town in Bolivia, were taken over by the subsidiary of a trans-national corporation, Bechdel. Water bills rose at an astounding rate, and people were charged even for collecting rainwater from their own roofs.The people revolted.Despite pressure from both private and public security services, the people of Cochabamba won through in 1995, and made a declaration -- reiterating, in more earth-centred language, the UN's declaration of … [Read more...]

The Common Riding: Langholm’s Great Day

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This Friday just gone was Langholm's Common Riding. Since I've lived in Eskdale, I've been both fascinated by Langholm Common Riding, and mainly stayed as far away from it as possible -- although I have been, once.It's an odd local custom, involving thousands of people, a couple of hundred horses, and an awful lot of alcohol. And for some Langholmites, it's a bigger day than Christmas.What happens on 'Langholm's Great Day'The Langholm Common Riding is held on the last Friday in July, … [Read more...]

The power of the song thrush: life, death and the feast of St. John

Image by Jose Sousa, used under Creative Commons license.

"'Twas on the twenty-fourth of June Oh, as I sat weaving all at my loom, 'Twas on the twenty-fourth of June Oh, as I sat weaving all at my loom, I heard a thrush, singing on yon bush, And the song she sang was the jug of punch."These words are the first verse of a traditional Irish drinking song, The Jug of Punch, in its simplest form. I'm thinking of it today, St. John's Eve. The feast of St. John, celebrated on the 23rd and 24th June, is a Christian gloss over the celebration of the … [Read more...]


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