Enough already!

Remembrance Day poppy, photo from the Guardian

At his preschool, my son made a poppy to wear for Remembrance Day, the British Equivalent of Veterans Day. He quite liked his poppy and made sure he was very careful with it. He wore his proudly in the middle of his shirt all day long. Until he asked why we wore poppies on this day.

I’m not sure what the preschool told him. I explained that the poppy flower symbolized remembering and today we were remembering the dead that had fought in wars. I explained that while war was a terrible thing, we needed to honor those that had fought for our freedoms. It was a way of honoring the dead of war, as well.

I think he’s a little burnt out on honoring the dead! After several days around Samhain and nearly nightly candle offerings to the Ancestors and Mighty Dead of our household, and now this, I think Son had decided he’d had enough. ‘I don’t want to remember the Dead! I don’t want to remember! I don’t want remember them! I don’t want to wear this poppy!’ he yelled. So we took it off. And then he proceeded to carry it around for the rest of the evening, being very careful with it.

Is any one else feeling worn out from two straight weeks honoring the Ancestors? For those of you with children, how do you talk to your children about the Dead?

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Full moon

In other news, I have been fighting a virus for a couple of weeks now. I think it has morphed into a low-grade ear infection. This has sapped my energy levels. I had hoped to finish up a tarot reading for a friend over the incredible full moon that just passed. I tend to feel less magical on full moons – I prefer the dark moon. But on a clear night with the moon shining bright I can’t help but want to go outside or get up to something. I’m hoping this illness will pass. I don’t feel I have a lot of energy for anything more than reading or breathing meditation. That makes for dull blogging, but there it is.

 

 

What sort of mischief or magic did you get up to during the full moon?

About Niki Whiting
  • http://parentingbythelightofthemoon.blogspot.com Lily Shahar Kunning

    While my son is a little young for actual discussions about the dead, I have actually thought about this question. I have always had a beloved dead altar in the dining room- because it is easier to offer food and drink if they are right there, ya know?

    I want honoring the ancestors to be a regularized thing with him, with this time of year set aside as special, because it is when they are most likely to come to this side. Activities will be designed around communicating with them this time of year, and simple offerings will happen year-round.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      We have a part of the altar with our pictures and a candle just for them. Bennett sees it, but I think he just got overloaded with ALL the talk of the dead lately. Thankfully, the concept of ‘dead’ is something we are not shy of talking about, so when we have to deal with it in a more personal way the groundwork is already there.


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