Wishbird

Last night I went to yoga for the first time in over a month. It wasn’t a difficult practice, but after being sick for so many weeks it challenged my body. I still think of myself as an ‘advanced beginner’ or ‘intermediate’ level yoga practitioner – even now, after years away from a regular practice! Sessions like last night’s are humbling, but also excellent opportunities to practice ‘beginner’s mind’ and return to basics. What is the most basic thing of all? The breath.

In between postures and on my walk to and from the class I focused on my breath. In and out, in and out. This simple refocusing – away from thoughts of being awesome or strong or fast – raised a lot of energy and grounded me simultaneously. One of the things I love about yoga is the semi-high feeling I get afterward. I feel at least two inches taller, rooted in each footstep, more fully present and connected to my Godsoul. It’s like I’m a spiritual ninja for about twenty minutes afterward! I attribute it all to focusing on breathing.

This type of breathing is a vital part of making magic. Getting grounded, being present, and raising lots of energy are core parts of making magic. So what did I do when I got home? Instead of going straight into the house, I went into the back garden to cast a little spell. I knew that if I went inside first I’d be distracted by children and dinner and needs and who knows if I’d have a few minutes, let alone the energy, to start all over again.

My family is moving in three weeks time. When I started this project I had assumed we’d be in Wales until at least next summer. That is not to be. We are leaving Wales on the 21st of December and leaving the UK a week later. (Yes, it coincides with the shift in spiritual quarters for me.) We are moving to Olympia, Washington, and we need a house, so I used my extra energy to send a wishbird to find one for us.

The wishbird is an exercise I learned from T Thorn Coyle. It involves raising energy, focusing on one’s need or desire, then blowing the energy into one’s hands while imagining a bird taking form. With specifics and intent firmly established you let fly the bird and it goes ahead to help. There are some other details to this, but this is a good, simple description of a good, simple spell. It has worked for my family before, and I hope it will do so again. I sent the bird off in a west by southwest direction. Hopefully, we’ll soon find a home – more than a house!

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Here is a link to a short post on spell work by a Feri friend of mine. I think she says far better what I’ve been trying to say about magic and spells.

About Niki Whiting
  • http://western-hindu.org/ Tāṇḍava

    Namashkar.

    Can you direct me to a simple explanation of the Fetch, the Talker, and Godself. I have a feeling that they must correspond to the manas (ego, emotional self), buddhi (intellect), and the atman (god within), but have not found a clear description.

    Aum

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      Hey…. sounds like you’ve been doing a little research! I have been avoiding writing about this concept, but I think I’ll just tackle it soon. I can link to a few places I like then. There are overlaps with esoteric Hindu ideas. Thanks for asking – it gives me a push.

      • http://western-hindu.org/ Tāṇḍava

        I look forward to reading it. I did a little research on the Feri Tradition and this is one of the concepts that I couldn’t find a clear explanation of. I think that your wishbird spell underlies the similarities between wicca and the tantric aspects of Hinduism. Hindus from traditions that don’t emphasise tantra would ask Ganesh to clear the obstacles to getting a home. Others would use tantra, probably drawing a Yanta, the use of incense, ritual cleaning, etc.

        Even the bhakti Hindus would use a murti, incense, and probably the ringing of a bell and chanting jappa when asking Ganesha to remove obstacles. It seems to me that every religion or path uses tantra to some extent.

        • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

          What is your definitely of tantra? It seems like you’re using it to indicate the trappings of ritual, or anything external? I have found that most religions use some forms of Stuff – incense, bells, music, chants, offerings, etc. But there are more mystical and magical crossovers between Tantra and traditional witchcraft, like Feri, that go beyond the Stuff.

          • http://western-hindu.org/ Tāṇḍava

            I would define tantra as the microcosm affecting the macrocosm. Any thought or action which affects the material or the spiritual without a direct line of physical cause and effect. The literal meaning of Tantra is loom or warp. Spiritual tantra uses this as an analogy for the flowing currents of prāṇa that connects all.

            At the basic level, if you see the bells and incense purely as working to get you in the right frame of mind for pūjā then that isn’t tantra. On the other hand if you see the use of rituals that have been used for aeons as bringing the physical plane and the spiritual closer together, and facilitating spiritual contact with the divine, then that’s tantra.

            Then there is tantra that effects the physical. By skilfully setting up vibrations in the prāṇa some people can guide the possibilities of what might happen. I am undecided on my beliefs onthis. At times I think “no, nobody could effect physical things without a physical connection”. At other times I think “well, when our vibrations are off we certainly seem to be able to jinx ourselves so things don’t work, so why can’t a ceremony, chant or thought set good vibrations and have a positive outcome”.

          • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

            I love that description of tantra as warp/weft of a loom. That’s very much how I think magic works. I continue to be skeptical, and am always surprised when magic works! But as Victor Anderson said, ‘perceive first, then believe.’

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