Virgin Mary in Song

Let’s have some music for your weekend!

My kids are feeling poorly. I’m blogged out from all the coverage of the Pantheacon transgender/Z Budapest conflict/discussion. So let’s have some beauty! To song!

The most famous of all songs about the Virgin Mary is the Ave Maria, the Latin version of the Hail Mary: “Hail Mary, full of grace, God is with you; blessed are you among women and blessed it the fruit of your womb, Jesus; Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.” This is a beautiful, simple prayer, that is essentially Marian theology distilled in to three sentences.

Let’s start with the most well known, and for good reason: Franz Schubert’s. I’m not sure who the singer or accompanist is but they do a very good job.

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I recently read the following in an article, which is well worth reading in its entirety. (Thanks, Adam.)

‘Franz Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” which surprised some music critics when it debuted in 1825: Schubert seldom showed religious feeling in his compositions, yet “Ave Maria” is a breathtaking work of adoration of the Virgin Mary. What was with the sudden piety? Schubert dryly answered: “I think this is due to the fact that I never forced devotion in myself and never compose hymns or prayers of that kind unless it overcomes me unawares; but then it is usually the right and true devotion.” This musical prayer became among the most familiar and enduring religious pieces in history.’

Franz Biebl’s version is perhaps my all time favorite choral work involving the Ave Maria. This version is done by the phenomenal all male ensemble, Chanticleer. (Check out the mustache on one of the singers!)

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Another musical Marian form is the Stabat Mater, from a 12th century poem. During this time period a new form of devotion developed in Europe, centered on the Mater Dolorosa – the Sorrowful Mother. Stabat Mater, Latin for ‘the Mother stood’, or with the first line of the poem (Stabat Mater dolorosa), ‘the sorrowful Mother stood’. What did she stand next to? The cross and Jesus, her son, crucified upon it. (For the absolute best book I’ve read about this form of devotion and its development, read Rachel Fulton’s From Judgement to Passion.)

In graduate school I wrote an entire paper on this particular poem and its use in music. I listened to something approaching twenty settings of it. The following are a few that stood out to me.

Here is Pergolesi’s version:

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Rossini’s:

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Dvorák’s, perhaps the most well-known setting, certainly the most well-known to me.

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For more modern interpretations, Arvo Pärt:

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Penderecki’s also impressed me, but I can’t find a good clip of it.

Let us not forget the glorious Eastern Orthodox tradition and their many songs to the Theotokos! The Estonian Phiharmonic Chamber Choir is world-renown and made a CD focusing on Russian Orthodox hymns. It is superb and I highly recommend it.

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Anyone know of some non-classical songs about Mary? Clearly my classical music background is getting the best of me! I know of one gospel song, The Virgin Mary had a Baby Boy, and Breath of Heaven by Amy Grant:

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Have a great weekend!

 

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About Niki Whiting
  • Amy

    I’m very fond of musical settings of the Magnificat, myself. Here are two of my favorites. Not all that surprising considering I’m also a huge fan of Irish and Scottish music.

    The first is called Canticle of the Turning, and it’s set to Star of the County Down and scored for guitar or piano, violin, and flute. The lyrics are reworded to sound more like an Irish epic poem in terms of syntax and imagery.

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXyGh1MW2OM&w=560&h=315

    Another is Holy Is Your Name by ubiquitous Catholic composer David Haas, set to the tune Wild Mountain Thyme. This is the best video I could find.

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIxNQtXNqDI&w=560&h=315

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      Thank you!

  • http://syamukamath.wordpress.com syamukamath

    We have many similar songs on Krishna and yasodha(the mother who lookd after, the real mum and dad were in jail).

  • http://iris365.wordpress.com Rebecka

    This was HUGE in my churches growing up. Like, entire church applauding and shouting huge:

    http://youtu.be/_U2G8wsbXBo

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      I have heard that before. It’s awful. And that video? Even worse!

      • http://iris365.wordpress.com Rebecka

        for sure!

  • Niklas Gander

    My favorite was always the plainchant

    Ave, Maria! Gratia plena! Dominus tecum.

    Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Jesum Christum.

    Sankta Maria, mater dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae!

    It was the preface before a number of marian hymns from the renaissance that I sang in a small group in college. I always loved the simplicity of the chant.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      That is the complete Hail Mary in Latin. Your memory is better than mine! It really is a beautiful prayer. I love singing early music.

  • s4rahislife

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMC1A2Z3UKo&feature=related from 03:26

    Come ye apostles, assembled here from the ends of the earth. Bury my body in Gethsemane, and thou My Son and God, receive My Spirit.

    Hope you like it :) xxx

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/awitchsashram myownashram

      Gasp! Yes! What is not to love about John Tavener? Beautiful. Thank you for adding this.

      • s4rahislife

        I always loved Mary. And really started loving Mary Magdalene after watching The Da Vinci Code. Blessings,

        Sas x

        • s4rahislife

          There’s just so many wonderful spirits out there for us to love and to love us. F*cking awesome. ‘Scuse the swearing if bothers you!

          I like your site and appreciate it, thanks!

          Blessed, revolving Equinox to thee.

          Sarah


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