The Agony in the Garden

He said to them, ‘My soul is sorrowful to the point of death. Wait here, and stay awake.’ (Mark 14:34)

Love is hard as Hell. Were we given the democratic opportunity to fashion the world as we wished, I imagine we’d have it otherwise. Love would be a comfort, an abstract — a flaccid feeling forever tickling us into smiles. But then again, why speculate? This is our zeitgeist. We live in an Age of Softening — our Love is but a pink-tinged means to ignoble ends. I’m in love with another, therefore I deserve a divorce. An affair. A marriage with my own sex, with a building, with myself. I love, therefore I deserve children. I love, therefore I deserve recognition and acceptance. I love and it feels great.

In an age of scandal, nothing is more scandalous than the Gospel, nothing more hideous than the Christian called to publicly proclaim “I love, therefore I die.”

Let the world soften the very fabric of the Cosmos. Let them make of Love a polite perfume. The bizarre and frightening followers of the Christ will forever point to Him lying on the floor in agony and say, “There is Love. Love smells like sweat. Love tastes like blood. Love feels like the very brink of destruction. Love is the hardest thing in existence — it will impale you to the ground.”

For Love is desiring the ultimate good of another. The Agony in the Garden is infinite proof that this desire doesn’t always feel great. No, it is far more often sorrowful — sorrowful to the point of death.

The first blood mentioned in Christ’s Passion comes not from the whips, nor the thorns, nor the cross, but from His anguish of Love. Gethsemane, the garden where the Lord began his Passion, mean oil-press. And here Christ, the first-fruit of God, was squeezed. In his anguish he prayed even more earnestly, and his sweat fell to the ground like great drops of blood. (Luke 22:44). Why are we given this image? Because we’ve already been told: Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he handed it to them, and all drank from it, and he said to them, ‘This is my blood, the blood of the covenant, poured out for many’ (Mark 14:23). We know that His blood is poured out for us. And here we see it: Christ is a living libation, a cup overflowing. Only the Christian can honestly bow before the sweat of Man.

Perhaps it would be best to remind ourselves of what the Christ is facing. He and he alone — being an infinite being — can redeem mankind’s infinite distance from God. He must become Sin, and be destroyed, so that Sin may be destroyed. He must take on the guilt and condemnation that belongs to every genocidal monster, pedophile priest, rapist, and murderer who ever existed. He must experience the sting of every human insult, hatred, oppression, and violence. He must enter every broken, masturbating, porn-addicted, drug-riddled shell of a man, and experience the total sum of our modern loneliness. This is what Love demands. Again, Love is desiring another’s ultimate good. What is our ultimate good? Eternal union with our Father. What price must the Christ pay for our ultimate good? Suffering unto death, the death of God.

And so Love sweats blood. In stark contradiction to the pretty shape our modern world would have us draw, Christ offers us a heart of meat, ventricles and arteries pounding.  Let’s together cease pretending Love is anything else. Let us cease splitting Love from it’s meaning — wanting the ultimate good of the other — and thus from suffering. Let us instead look to Christ’s Agony in the Garden, and beg God to set us ablaze with His uncomfortable, aching Love, the only kind worth having.

  • Padrebarnes

    This parish priest really enjoys all of your posts.

  • Louise

    Loved it from the first sentence. Thank you for articulating this so well.

  • Annalisa Tombelli

    “Let us cease splitting Love from it’s meaning — wanting the ultimate good of the other — and thus from suffering.” Marc, this post just affirmed a very hard decision I recently made while in Eucharistic adoration this afternoon. Thank you. I want to say to you, “Yes, I’m ready to embrace Christ in this agony of love, and therefore suffering!”, but Christ’s words echo roaring over them, “Can you drink the cup I am going to drink?”. It’s a dare I’ve always shuddered at because I know how weak I am. But Christ’s response, “You will indeed drink from my cup”, demonstrates that it has already been preordained, this communion of suffering, for He and I, me and you, and all Catholics to partake in. It’s time to embrace Holy Week not as an idea, but as an end. The means, as you said, is suffering. But in joy and hope! Thanks again, Marc.

  • Lisa

    Quite beautifully said. Thank you.

  • Paula

    outstanding, Marc. thank you. i look forward to sharing this post with my students.

  • Guest

    Love is not suffering.

    A mother does not suffer when she chooses to buy food for her child rather than a new pair of shoes for herself. Yes, her feet will hurt if she has no shoes, but that pain pales in comparison to the joy she gets from her child’s health and happiness. The only kind of mother who experiences suffering in this situation is the one who values her child’s happiness less than her own sore feet.

    No good mother begrudgingly chooses to provide for her child. A good mother willingly provides for her child because seeing her child happy brings the mother joy. The mother’s “suffering” without shoes is only suffering if she wants the shoes more than she wants her child to be happy.

    Jesus did not choose the path of greatest suffering when he went to the cross for us. Yes he suffered – and suffered terribly – but his choice was joy. He chose the path to the cross because his joy in our salvation is greater than the pain he experienced to achieve it.

    I do not love my child for her sake – I love her for my own. I find joy in her happiness; I experience pain when she suffers. When I go without for the sake of my child, I do not suffer – I experience joy in my child’s happiness.

    Christ does not call to us to embrace his love and join him in suffering. He calls us to embrace his love and join him in joy!

    Let us cease splitting love from its meaning – Joy.

    If love requires me to choose suffering over joy, pain in the place of happiness, then I want none of it.

    • Kateri

      That’s very profound. I think the truth that brings it all together is that suffering is joy when it is done for love.

    • Blessedgoddess09

      Just assuming a mother who has to choose her child over herself, isn’t always as superficial as shoes vs food. What about the mother that has to choose between food for her child and paying the utility bill? There is joy for sure in sacrificing for your child, but to assume all choices are superficial is to take a very shallow view of love. And before you ask, I’ve had to make that choice. I would make the same one over again if I had to.

      Marc-beautiful post. And profoundly true, as always.

    • Chip Hopr

      “Christ does not call to us to embrace his love and join him in suffering.”

      Oh, really? Who told you that? Not trying to be flippant; I’d really like to hear your defense of that statement.

      ” He calls us to embrace his love and join him in joy!”

      False dichotomy. There can be joy in suffering, and joy through it.

      “If love requires me to choose suffering over joy, pain in the place of happiness, then I want none of it.”

      Thankfully, it asks you not to choose one over, or in place of, another. Love is self-sacrificial. There is pain, suffering, and joy and happiness in that. I have a hard time believing this to be so, but your post really seems to imply that for you, love is ultimately self-serving, self-interested. And that Christ’s was, too.

      My guess is that you’re misunderstanding suffering. When you suffer for the sake of another, it is still suffering, regardless of the joy you get out of their happiness. And for that matter, love drives us to suffer on another’s behalf, irrespective of the possibility of reciprocation.

      Your example of parents and children is perfect. A parent will never get out anywhere close to what they put into their children. They will suffer, through love, and the joy and happiness that the child turns out will be far from directly proportional. But the parent will do it anyway. That is love.

      • Guest

        My defense of the statement “Christ does not call to us to embrace his love and join him in suffering” is simple. If the price of Christ’s eternal love is eternal suffering then why should I seek it?

        Why do you believe love is not self-interested? Do you think Christ endured the cross to open the gates of heaven for us when, in fact, he did not want us there with him? Do you think our salvation displeases God? If our salvation does please God, then please show me how our salvation was contrary to Christ’s self-interest.

        I am not seeing a false dichotomy. I am pointing out the contradiction in the statement ‘love is suffering’. Pain is not pleasure, sorrow is not happiness, ignorance is not knowledge, freedom is not slavery, peace is not war, love is not suffering.

        Why do you want someone to love you? Because they experience suffering inorder to fulfill your life or because your presence in their life brings them joy?

        Love is not always easy. There is no doubt about that. In every loving relationship there are moments of pain, but to then conclude that suffering is therefore implicit within love is incorrect. Love exists despite suffering – not because of it. To say ‘love cannot exist without suffering’ is akin to saying ‘buildings cannot exist without earthquakes’.

        • Anonymous

          >Pain is not pleasure, sorrow is not happiness, ignorance is not knowledge, freedom is not slavery, peace is not war, love is not hate.

          Fixed this for you. Try to pull one over on me…

          > To say ‘love cannot exist without suffering’ is akin to saying ‘buildings cannot exist without earthquakes’.

          That implies that suffering can damage love, when we have seen time and time again it only enhances it. Love is self-sacrificial, agape. It gives of itself for another. If I give suffering for another, it enhances love, not destroys it. You seem to think that there can be no joy in suffering, which you have shown there can be, I endure pain and hardship because I know, I believe, that it will result in more joy later on.

          >Jesus did not choose the path of greatest suffering when he went to the cross for us. Yes he suffered – and suffered terribly – but his choice was joy. He chose the path to the cross because his joy in our salvation is greater than the pain he experienced to achieve it.

          So you believe that calvary was ultimately selfish? That He did it for himself rather than for us?

          1 Corinthians 4-7 must mean nothing to you then.

          • Guest

            Thank you for correcting “love is not suffering” to “love is not hate”; my statement was incorrect. I would like to add to your statement however: Hate seeks to bring suffering, love seeks to bring joy. Hate embraces suffering and rejects joy; love embraces joy and rejects suffering – both for oneself and for others.

            I will not only imply that suffering can damage love, I will state it outright: Suffering can damage love, even destroy it. If suffering did not damage love then no wife would ever leave an unfaithful, lying, abusive husband.

            I struggle to understand why anyone would defend self-immolation as a moral virtue. If it is immoral to cause suffering to another, then why is it moral to seek suffering for yourself?

            How can you follow the moral code that suffering is beneficial to love? I assume you believe that love is good and righteous – a thing to be spread far and wide. If you believe this, then these are the actions required by the code “suffering enhances love”.

            1. Love should be shared with as many people as possible.
            2. Suffering enhances love
            3. To enhance the love I feel for others, I should seek suffering for myself.
            4. To enhance the love others feel, I should act to cause them suffering.
            5. The more suffering I experience and the more suffering those around me experience the greater the love between us becomes.

            Here are the actions required by the code “joy enhances love”.

            1. Love should be shared with as many people as possible.
            2. Joy enhances love
            3. To enhance the love I feel for others, I should seek joy for myself.
            4. To enhance the love others feel, I should act to cause them joy.
            5. The more joy I experience and the more joy those around me experience, the greater the love between us becomes.

            Jesus acted to enhance our joy by cleansing us of our sins and opening the gates of heaven (an outcome that presumably pleases Him; makes Him joyful). In our turn we should live righteous, moral lives to lessen his suffering on the cross – to enhance his joy (and by living moral, love filled lives; bring joy to ourselves).

            Suffering is often experienced during love but it is not suffering which makes love meaningful – it is the joy. Love weathers suffering as a ship weathers a storm. Sometimes love falters and is broken, other times it emerges intact. The fierceness of the storm does not make the ship sturdier; it reviles the strength it has always had. In the same way suffering does not foster love but reveals the true strength of the love. It is only in the safe port – in joy – that the hull of the ship is strengthened – that love grows stronger.

            Just as a ship stranded in an infinite storm will be dashed apart and broken in the onslaught of waves, a love founded upon suffering will be torn asunder, leaving behind a broken, unfulfilled life.

          • Tim Ohmes

            You have a serious misunderstanding of what Marc is stating.

            Instead of saying:

            “3. To enhance the love I feel for others, I should seek suffering for myself.”

            Understand it as: To enhance the love I feel for others, I must accept suffering which may come my way if my decision to accept it may lead to a greater benefit to another.

            “4. To enhance the love others feel, I should act to cause them suffering.”

            ‘Cause them suffering’ is a very wide brush. As a parent I have to discipline my children, I am sure at the time they consider it ‘suffering’ even when it is making them eat dinner. In one sense I am causing ‘suffering’ and I do feel it may lead to ability to love.

            However, I am not at liberty to abuse or cause physical or emotional harm to my children, spouse, or anyone else. I may not cause suffering to anyone to promote love.

            I am also required to relieve the suffering of others to the best of my abilities. I am called to be compassionate with the suffering I cannot relieve. Compassion means literally “to suffer with”.

            I still may embrace my ‘suffering’ caused by others and forgive them out of love for them and love for Christ.

            “The more suffering I experience and the more suffering those around me experience the greater the love between us becomes.”

            “Experience” is the wrong term. Merely experiencing something has little meaning in itself. It is what I do with the experience; how I react to it. If I react with anger, pride, hatred, or violence love may indeed die.

            I think you are mistakenly thinking the statement being made is “the more suffering we cause the better the world would be”.

            It would be better understood as “accepting suffering with love and forgiveness (even when unjust) will lead to a greater love than would any other reaction we could make.”

          • Awoz76

            “Hate seeks to bring suffering…”

            In my opinion, hate does not seek suffering on someone, to hate is to seek joy from someones suffering.
            I have a friend who was infatuated with a girl but thought it was love. I spoke with him and explained the difference. He stopped seeing her, it was painful. Heck, it hurt me to see him suffer. Weeks later we spoke and he said he finally understood. According to your definition i hate him, is that how you see it?

        • Chip Hopr

          After having read your responses to my comment and others’, I’ll say this simply.

          If you truly hold that:

          1. Love is inherently self-serving and self-interested, and rightly so,

          2. Christ’s example of love is also selfish and self-interested and,

          3. Suffering has no rightful place in love

          then as one Christian to (presumably) another, I must say, your opinion is misguided at best, heretical at worst. You are out of line with the thinking of Christ and His Church and its greatest and holiest members. It’s that serious. I’d strongly suggest refraining from potentially causing scandal by spreading your idea of selfish “love” with others. You’d also do well to re-read the words of Christ, (in fact the entire New Testament), as well as the Church Fathers, Doctors, and more recent holy people (like Bl. JPII) with regards to love and suffering.

          I’m out, but let me at least leave you with this. Suffering is a reality. It needs not be sought out or fabricated. But when it comes, and it will, whenever we choose to truly love, we Christians embrace it, like Christ did, for, and out of love. And when we embrace it with an attitude similar to our Beloved Lord’s, rather than shun and avoid it, it purifies and strengthens our love, and unites us ever more deeply with Christ and His Church.

          • Guest

            Borderline heretical…

            If believing a love that brings joy to everyone involved is preferable to a love that brings joy to one and suffering to the other – and believing that such a love can exist – boarders on heresy, then I would hate to be anything else.

          • Lily

            But think, for example, of a less warm and fuzzy example. It’s easy to love children, but so easy to love some others:

            Lets say that a man killed your child, in cold blooded murder, just to see what killing someone felt like. That’s about as bad as you can get (or as bad as I’m willing to hypotheticalize when a child is involved). As a Christian, you are called to love that terrible, evil person who totally doesn’t deserve your love. What is more, you are called to forgive him. And lets say you do, and when the death penalty comes up in court, you plead for a lighter sentence in hopes that maybe someday that murdering sicko can repent. That is love, a love without joy. Sure, someone might find peace from forgiving this guy, but many wouldn’t. You’d live the rest of your life knowing that you saved to life of the man who killed your child. I think many days would involve suffering, whether in sorrow or a sort of hollowness. But everyday would involve love, because you decided that you wanted what was best for another human, even if that human was a murderer.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/thecrescat Katrina Fernandez

      So if something does not give me an immediate sense of joy it is not love?

      Bosh.

    • Dabhidh

      I do not believe that joy is the meaning of love. Joy is the by-product of love. Love has meaning in an of itself. And if you want none of suffering over joy, or pain in the place of happiness, then you want none of Christ. Did He ultimately experience joy? Yes, most certainly. But he went through unimaginable suffering to do so, and then He told us to follow Him there.

      Let us cease splitting love from joy? Rather, let us put away childish things. Suffering and pain are inescapable existential realities. Let us rejoice that they may also be endured in the service of Love.

    • Jake E

      “I do not love my child for her sake – I love her for my own. I find joy in her happiness; I experience pain when she suffers. When I go without for the sake of my child, I do not suffer – I experience joy in my child’s happiness.”

      When I first read this I was scared, for your parenting’s sake. But after further reading, I believe you have misinterpreted the feeling of parental love. For how can you love someone for your own sake (in and of itself being a selfish statement) if you feel hurt your daughter is hurt?

      When we read 1 Corinthians 4-7 the main thing we get from Love is that it is never self-serving, even though it is not a delegated characteristic. The nature of your parental love you have stated, and the one you explained are polar opposites of each other. For to do anything for your own sake is selfish – there must be someone else involved (be it your daughter, God or anyone else) for an action to be unselfish. But to experience hurt or happiness according to your daughter gets precisely to the heart of what BadCatholic is talking about: sacrifice. You are giving up whatever emotions you otherwise would be feeling without your daughter or if you didn’t care for her, for her because you love her and have a will to serve her. Sacrifice is a form of suffering, even if it is joyous, for it is the act of giving up for the sake another, and therefore, to the Almighty.

      “Jesus did not choose the path of greatest suffering when he went to the cross for us. Yes he suffered – and suffered terribly – but his choice was joy. He chose the path to the cross because his joy in our salvation is greater than the pain he experienced to achieve it.”

      As for this one, please watch the Passion of the Christ. According to all accounts, he certainly suffered more than I can imagine, which if I may indulge, is a whole hell of a lot.

      • Guest

        But I am not sacrificing… given the choice between between my daughter and some other emotion/desire, I choose my daughter. There is no suffering in this choice. I choose the greater joy of my daughter over the lesser joy.

        Of course it would be nice to have both, but I do not suffer because I am only given one gift. Choosing the one I want more is not a sacrifice, it is acting in my own self-interest. I only sacrifice by choosing a lesser joy over a greater joy.

        The currency of love is joy, not suffering. I receive joy from those I love and in turn, I bring joy to those who love me (or at least that is my most fervent hope). Love is not measured by the trials it endures but the joy it provides. Love is not the willingness to suffer for someone else – it is the emancipation from suffering.

        Anyone who demands that I suffer for them – demands that I forfeit my happiness for their sake – does not love me.

        Marc has made many excellent points in previous posts but, in the second to last sentence of this post, when he places suffering on a pedestal and proclaim “This is the meaning of love!” he debases love at its most fundamental level and strips it of its value.

        • Awoz76

          “Love is not measured by the trials it endures, but the joy it provides.”

          I find that a bit problematic. Let me explain:

          When I was younger, I fell in “love” with a girl. All we did was have sex.
          Tons of joy, positive feelings, excitement. No suffering at all. That relationship ended.

          Now I am in a relationship where we talk, learn about eachother, work together…and argue. About the best way to raise kids, about healthy food, about emotions, etc. I find that arguing is painful. I suffer during them. But I am willing to take this suffering to be with her. On top of that, we are waiting for marriage with sex. That is also suffering, every time I see her or hold her hand.
          But again I do this for her.

          My question is:
          This relationship has never reached that climactic joy of having sex together….so according to you Guest, does that make my first relationship more loving?

    • Kelsey Kaufman

      This outlook reflects a self-interest in each loving relationship that you claim to have, where you are actually loving yourself and not the other. If you truly do want to love another, you must will their good. Sometimes, for the sake of the others’ good we have to die to ourselves, yet by offering up these small sacrifices we have joy knowing our communion with Christ in his offering of his very life for our offenses.

      If you look throughout the New Testament, especially in the letters from St. Paul he speaks much of suffering, and how “living is Christ and dying is gain” (Phil 1:21), or in his letter to Timothy when he states that “we must not be afraid of testifying to the Lord, but take our share of suffering for the gospel” (1:8) and my personal favorite in the letter of St. James: “Blessed is the man who endures trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life which God has promised to those who love him” (1:12). Sounds pretty good to me. And well worth the small amount of suffering we could possibly endure in our short time on this earth.

      When we have to sacrifice to show our love for Jesus, our friends and family, and even those with whom we are at odds, it is “putting our money where our mouth is,” so to speak. We love those around us not for our own gain, but because it was commanded to us in the Gospels (Mt 22:36-40).

      • Guest

        Your first sentence summarizes my almost perfectly. I absolutely advocate self-interest in each loving relationship I have. When those around me suffer, I suffer. When those around me are joyful, I am joyful. Why is it assumed that to bring myself joy I must bring another person pain? Is the price of another person’s my happiness my suffering?

        If this is the case then love is a zero sum game – my joy requires another person’s suffering. I reject this tenant.

        I like the verse “Blessed is the man who endures trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life which God has promised to those who love him”. I interpret it differently however. I do not see it as a call to sacrifice but as a call to uphold one’s own moral tenants. The man who endures the trial does so by his own willful choice. He has chosen God’s promise over society’s approval. He did not sacrifice, he chose what he wanted– he acted in his own self-interest.

        Love is the same. To sacrifice is to choose what I value less over what I value more. I love of my own free will, not because I am obliged to do so. Nor do I want anyone to love me out of a sense of duty. I want them to love me because they want to love me – because my wellbeing brings them joy. Obligatory love is joyless and therefore not love at all.

        I find joy when those I love are joyful. My joy, and the joy of those I love are not in opposition, they are one-in-the-same.

        I don’t believe God doesn’t ask us live righteous lives out of a begrudging sense of duty, but because we want to – because we find personal joy and fulfillment in living the gospel.

    • http://delphipsmith.livejournal.com/ DelphiPsmith

      Very well said.

  • Robin

    I am crying.

  • http://www.2catholicmen.blogspot.com/ Ben of the Two Men

    Indeed love is a choice, an act of the will and not an emotion. Of course, our choices lead to emotions and the amount of emotion depends on the temperament of the individual.

  • Theophilus

    Pure poetry. I expect to see this in next year’s Magnificat for one of the Holy Week Day By Day readings.

  • Jay E.

    Not much you can say after that… except perhaps the words of T.S. Eliot of: “some infinitely gentle, infinitely suffering thing.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/maryliziz Mary Liz Bartell

    Agape!

  • http://www.facebook.com/daniel.woike Daniel George Ignatius Woike

    How do you write so well at only 18, and do it so often too. Its amazing.

  • whimsy

    According to the Roy Orbison song, Love Hurts, therefore Love is a Lie. That is what makes this post controversial.

    • joac

      welcome, dear visitor from the Roy Orbison Advent Church for Pretty Women.

  • Rachel

    “Love without suffering is meaningless. Suffering without love is unendurable.” – Pope Benedict XVI

    • http://delphipsmith.livejournal.com/ DelphiPsmith

      “Love without suffering is meaningless.”

      Why? Isn’t love without suffering that much more joyous, more wonderful, more ecstatic?

      • Scott

        The pope doesn’t mean that every single moment of love is filled with pain and drudgery. Rather he’s talking about a love that is nothing more than “pleasure-seeking.” True love is a sacrificial love – therefore a man will love his wife in health AND in sickness, in the good times AND the bad, a priest will love the Church when he is promoted and affirmed AND when he is scrutinized and overlooked. Therefore, if you only can will to love these things when they are good to you, that is not love but self-seeking. Maybe a better way of putting it is that suffering is the test of love.

  • Tcrmc1126

    This is beautiful…You have an amazing God given gift. Thank you for sharing it.

  • Calebt45

    …on the palms of the child’s hands were the prints of two nails, and the prints of two nails were on the little feet.

    “Who hath dared to wound thee?” cried the Giant; “tell me, that I may take my big sword and slay him.”

    “Nay!” answered the child; “but these are the wounds of Love.”

    “Who art thou?” said the Giant, and a strange awe fell on him, and he knelt before the little child.

  • sweating what?

    “sweat like drops of blood”… yeah, right.

    or not? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematidrosis

    • Anonymous

      >Another effect is that the skin becomes extremely tender and fragile, so that any pressure or damage to the skin is more than ordinarily painful.

      So the crucifixion was EVEN WORSE than people think.

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/thecrescat Katrina Fernandez

    Every parent knows the suffering that love causes and the sacrifices they gladly make for their children that manifests this love. If people stopped aborting their children they would be given the chance to experience this fragile, sacrificial, hard and painful love… and the world would be a lot less evil.

  • Tracee Portka

    hardcore in a profoundly truthful way…. thank you

  • http://twitter.com/LitaLedesma Lita Ledesma

    “Let the world soften the very fabric of the Cosmos. Let them make of Love a polite perfume. The bizarre and frightening followers of the Christ will forever point to Him lying on the floor in agony and say, ‘There is Love. Love smells like sweat. Love tastes like blood. Love feels like the very brink of destruction. Love is the hardest thing in existence — it will impale you to the ground.’”

    Genius.

  • http://newagora.me/ Chris Scribner

    Very eloquent post, Marc. Tried making this point to a friend, and got into a polite combox war. Sending this post his way – keep posting!

    http://newagora.me/2012/03/24/i-believe-in-a-god-of-love/
    http://catholicgraymatters.blogspot.com/2012/04/love-me-like-my-dog.html

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/GNAX2SPNHQA6R5M42U27KM66VA DawnEmpress

    So terribly, wonderfully true. Too many people today don’t ever realize that love is much, much more than a good feeling, its the will to hand oneself over to another, for another, sacrificing yourself for that other person…

  • Scram

    Wow, just discovered your blog, I quoted some of this on my Facebook, AMDG Marc, Happy Easter from New Zealand :-)

  • Elisa A

    Would you mind putting the sources for the artwork? I’d love to know who made the first one. It’s beautiful.

  • Thomas

    First of all this is the best testimony to love I’ve ever read in my young life. Second: I have just finished reading some of the comments on this article. I must ask that those who disagree with the tenant reread what is written here. I cannot put into words what I seek to say as well as this man (Marc?). However, maybe I can expand on it a little bit.

    Not long ago, but before I read this article I came to realize that love without suffering is trash. Speaking to men like me here. What is your love worth if you don’t feel the need to seek your wife’s greater joy no matter what the cost? Nothing. Nothing at all. If you can’t put down the remote control, if you can’t stop fixing your car and listen to her for 5 minutes you don’t truly love her. If that miniscule bit of suffering isn’t worth it to you, she isn’t worth it to you either.

    That is basically what is being said here, except it is applicable to all forms of daily life. To willingly inflict suffering is to hate. To suffer in the interests of effective communication, preservation of human life, and the protection of human freedom is to love.

  • Caitlin

    Ugh. This is so good it’s almost sickening…


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