Computer Generated Essays based on Random Words

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Those folks at www.elsewhere.org must not have much to do. So they’ve invented a program that will randomly pick words to generate an essay that sounds somewhat coherent. No kidding! Try out for example www.elsewhere.org/pomo,…. or the essay below.

Sadly, I’ve read less coherent essays than the follows at the schools where I’ve taught….

1. Expressions of rubicon

If one examines expressionism, one is faced with a choice: either reject textual sublimation or conclude that language serves to exploit minorities. However, Marx suggests the use of expressionism to deconstruct capitalism.

“Sexual identity is part of the dialectic of narrativity,” says Baudrillard; however, according to Long[1] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the dialectic of narrativity, but rather the fatal flaw, and subsequent futility, of sexual identity. Sartre’s model of textual sublimation implies that context must come from the masses, but only if consciousness is interchangeable with art. But Prinn[2] states that we have to choose between expressionism and the neocultural paradigm of consensus.

The primary theme of the works of Joyce is a capitalist paradox. In Finnegan’s Wake, Joyce reiterates Lyotardist narrative; in A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man he denies textual sublimation. Thus, Lyotard uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the role of the writer as reader.

“Truth is dead,” says Baudrillard. If textual sublimation holds, we have to choose between pretextual capitalist theory and postsemanticist materialism. However, the masculine/feminine distinction intrinsic to Joyce’s Dubliners is also evident in Ulysses, although in a more mythopoetical sense.

Marx uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote the common ground between class and reality. Therefore, textual sublimation suggests that narrativity is used to entrench class divisions.

Several theories concerning Lyotardist narrative exist. It could be said that the subject is contextualised into a textual paradigm of discourse that includes reality as a totality.

Parry[3] holds that we have to choose between expressionism and the poststructuralist paradigm of context. Thus, the subject is interpolated into a Lyotardist narrative that includes consciousness as a whole.

The characteristic theme of Cameron’s[4] essay on expressionism is the role of the poet as artist. However, a number of constructions concerning the paradigm, and some would say the meaninglessness, of cultural society may be discovered.

The subject is contextualised into a Lyotardist narrative that includes narrativity as a paradox. It could be said that Marx’s critique of expressionism implies that the Constitution is capable of intention.
2. Joyce and Lyotardist narrative

If one examines expressionism, one is faced with a choice: either accept subconceptual materialist theory or conclude that the purpose of the poet is social comment. If textual sublimation holds, the works of Joyce are empowering. But Baudrillard promotes the use of neocapitalist discourse to read and attack reality.

Pickett[5] states that we have to choose between expressionism and the precapitalist paradigm of reality. In a sense, Sartre suggests the use of Lyotardist narrative to deconstruct capitalism.

The failure of textual sublimation which is a central theme of Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man emerges again in Ulysses. However, expressionism holds that culture is part of the absurdity of truth, given that Baudrillard’s model of conceptual subdialectic theory is invalid.

Any number of narratives concerning textual sublimation exist. Therefore, if Lyotardist narrative holds, we have to choose between textual sublimation and capitalist theory.

1. Long, P. ed. (1979) The Iron Key: Nationalism, expressionism and subcapitalist libertarianism. University of Michigan Press

2. Prinn, J. K. (1982) Expressionism and Lyotardist narrative. University of Oregon Press

3. Parry, G. Y. T. ed. (1999) Realities of Failure: Nationalism, neocultural capitalist theory and expressionism. Panic Button Books

4. Cameron, I. (1970) Lyotardist narrative and expressionism. Schlangekraft

5. Pickett, O. Q. ed. (1984) Reinventing Socialist realism: Expressionism and Lyotardist narrative. University of California Press


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