An Update on the Presbyterian Church that Meets Online

Photo by stevewall on Flickr

As many of you know the past year has had me exploring many options for ministry. One of those things was to begin thinking about the formation of a Presbyterian church that meets online. It is hard to believe that we floated this idea about six months ago. My how times flies.  This project has spurred some good conversations about church, social media and community.

Like any group of folks with many projects on their plates, the leadership team has been going through the ebbs and flows life, ministry and planning. Over the past 18 months, I too have been riding the rhythms of life, engaged in my own sabbatical of wandering and discernment. So while this new community will contiue to move forward, yesterday I shared this update with our Facebook Group letting them know that I’m pulling back from driving the project.

Greetings all,

I hope folks are doing well and enjoying the Fall season.

First, let me say that I am feeling a little sheepish about not being as consistent and committed to this church online adventure that I had hoped to be. More than usual, life has been a little overwhelming and my own long-term discernment has been unexpectedly paralyzing.

That said, I am starting to see where I am headed and this has created a situation where I need lesson my involvement in some projects. It feels great to begin seeing some clarity of call, but I am also know that I have invited many folks into some things that I can no longer be part of in the same way: and for this I am sorry. So, yes, “a church online” will be one of the areas from which I will step back in leadership.

So what is next for this group? While I understand that I bring particular strengths and gifts to the endeavor, the ideas and questions from which this community has emerged goes way beyond any of us. I intensely believe that the idea of a church that meets online has huge possibilities. I will still be involved as I can, but Katie Mulligan and Derrick Weston have agreed to take the wheel and drive the proverbial leadership bus for the near future. I think they will help us to step back and take a more thoughtful approach to beginning this new community of faith. THIS PROJECT IS NOT OVER and I hope you will find a way to continue should you feel inspired to do so.

I also want to thank a few folks who walked this journey this far as part of the initial leadership team: Jennifer Owen Walsh, Jack Jenkins, Betsy Katz, Noelle Royer, Stephen Salyards, Bridgett Green, Mihee Kim-Kort, Katie and Derrick. I count them as dear friends and part of my church.

Lastly, while exact plans for future communication and social media platforms are still being worked out, for now, this Facebook Group is the place where people can stay updated, so please feel free to share this note and invite more folks into this next stage of the journey.

And my the peace of Christ be with you all!
Bruce

Now this does not mean that I have decided what is next as I am still embracing the luxury that is discernment mode. The decision to pull back from this project only means that some possibilities are being narrowed down and my call is coming more into focus. Believe me, I look forward to the day what I can post some grand announcement about my future.

Thanks to everyone who has mused about this idea with me and I hope that you will continue to stay connected and support this new church.  If you want to keep up with next steps for this project, request to join the Facebook Group, a church online | beta

The Church’s Doomed Pursuit of the Elusive Young Adult

Photo by www.flickr.com/photos/donsolo/

It seems that everywhere you look today, “the church,” especially within historic traditions, is talking about reaching that ever-elusive young adult demographic.  Sometimes it feels like we are on some National Geographic safari trying to observe and conserve some rare creature, but all-in-all I think it’s a great endeavor and worth the effort. At the same time, I am also worried that in our excitement about new ministries, creative initiatives and renewed energy focused on young adults that we are doomed even before we begin.

As I reflect on my own stage of ministry, after 25 years of working in the church including 17 years or ordained ministry, I am keenly aware of my short-comings when it comes to reaching young adults. My Gen X worldview and ecclesiastic experience often cloud my judgement and my aversion to getting old can be a stumbling block to my own continued growth in ministry. I think the church as a living body is not much different in our current stage of life. Over the generations, what the church has done in the world has been amazing and powerful, but those resting on the laurels of those accomplishments often hampers our ability to see the church of the future; one that could have the same impact on the world. So before we journey too far down the path of our young adults expedition, I would offer three faulty assumptions that many of us make when thinking about young adults and the future of the church.

ASSUMPTION 1 -WE can build a ministry for Young Adults.
I find it interesting that most of the conversations about “reaching young adults” take place among people who are distinctly NOT young adults. I think it is a way that many of us try to prove that 40 really IS the new 20 and extend our youth for as long as we can. Sorry folks, but as we age, our roles and perspectives change. I for one do not regret this, rather I embrace and welcome the roles that I will hold in the future. If we are reach young adults with integrity, then young adults must to be at the table and part of the direction setting in significant ways. Much like we would never plant a Korean American church with a team that was 90% non-Korean, we must not try to create relevant young adults ministries by relying on the musings of even the best intentioned 40, 50 and 60 year-olds. For as hip of a 43-year-old as I fool myself into believing I am, I do not and will not experience the world through the eyes of a 20-year-old . . . and there is nothing I can do to change that. The best thing I can do is to acknowledge this reality and then find the best ways to empower, guide and support that 20-year-old as she/he discovers a place and role in the future of the church. This posture must be taken in all aspects of the journey: planning process, fiscal management, organizational development, etc. if we are to truly create and sustain ministry with and for young adults.

ASSUMPTION 2 -There is such a thing as A Young Adult. 
One of the glaring generational differences that seems to take over young adult conversations is the idea that there is “A Young Adult” that can be defined and targeted. Sure, there are ways that we can glean some common young adult characteristics, but unlike previous generations, these definitions are far more DEscriptive than PREscriptive. I can hear it now, “We Boomers are not all the same, how dare you, you disrepectful Gen X’er!” Fair enough, but on this we will have to agree to disagree. I am not saying that previous generations are soulless robots programmed to all like the same things, but I think it is fair to say that in previous generational times more people liked the same things whereas in our today’s niche culture, more people like more things. This diversity within a demographic throws our tried and true methodological approach to ministry all into a tizzy because it means that we will have to deal with diverse expressions of faith. How do we measure and assess these things? How do we fund them? What kind of leadership is needed? All important questions that can only be effectively addressed by taking seriously Assumption 1.

ASSUMPTION 3 -Young Adults will help the church I love to live on!
If we are honest, the main reason most of us are hopping on the Young Adult Train is because we think we need them to survive and sustain the church that we have been part of.  To some extent that is true and noble if we are thinking about “the church” as a way of being and not a style, ideology or program. However, if reaching young adults is only, even mostly, about self-preservation, we have already chosen a path of death without hope for resurrection. On the other hand, if we are about seeing the end of the particular manifestation of the church as a natural life stage and rhythm of life, then we can move into our death strengthened by the promise of resurrection and new life. Yes, some aspects of the church past are destined to continue in some fashion, but if our primary reason for reaching young adults is to preserve what has always been, then we have already stopped being a church worth preserving at all.

I realize that some will now accuse me of dismissing the importance and presence of older adults in the church. I can’t help if that is your initial and only reaction other than to encourage you to think about your role in helping to define the future of the church as an evolving role and not an abdication of presence. One can be young in spirit and energy until death, but to deny the wisdom that age and experience can offer the future is to deny the work of Christ that has been cultivated in all of us over time. Our role in defining the future will depend on context, but if the only role that you or I can see for ourselves is to be upfront determining the direction of the church, we will fail. To me, this is not an acceptable choice, so I must now learn how to gauge the right time and way to lift and support up young adults who can better and more naturally see the future of and God’s intentions for the Body of Christ. This is my shifting roll that I will live and be with all of the youthfulness and vibrancy that this creaky body muster . . . I can’t wait to see what happens.


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