How My Atheism Affects My Philosophy Class

After dissecting in my last blog post the absurdity and amazing hypocrisy of persecution complexes related to philosophy classes that one sees routinely on display in Christian chain e-mails and now an upcoming movie, I decided in this post I want to talk about my atheism relates to my philosophy classes. In order to get to [Read More...]

Adjunct Exploitation, An Infographic

A handy infographic about the kinds of infuriatingly unjust predicaments that many professors, including me, find ourselves in: A year ago, I talked about my own plight as an underpaid, overworked, and under-appreciated adjunct professor. In the last year, I have taken to developing my own, relatively cheap, online classes that anyone can take using [Read More...]

Philosophical Advice for a Procrastinating Graduate Student

This is a long post about procrastination. It is long for three reasons:

(1) I have long experience myself with procrastination and specifically with graduate school induced procrastination, and a ton to say about it.

(2) People who suffer from procrastination I think will be greedy for as much insight and help as they might be able to get.

(3) A nice, 4,000 word article is ideal for procrastinators because it can either give an excuse to spend a lot of time not working or become so much of a chore that just getting back to the work you’re supposed to be doing suddenly seems preferable. Whichever this turns out to be for you: you’re welcome. [Read more...]

The History of English in 10 Minutes

A fun cartoon video on the history of English. [Read more...]

Announcing The Schedule For My Summer 2013 Online Interactive Classes Available To All

Here are the courses I am offering this summer using Google Hangout’s interactive video conferencing technology! Click on the post for full course descriptions and more information. Write me at camelswithhammers at gmail dot com in order to get your own questions answered or to enroll immediately!

Philosophy for Atheists, Sunday nights 8-11pm EDT from June 2-September 1 (13 week course).

Nietzsche, Tuesday/Thursday nights 7-9pm EDT from June 4-August 15 (10 week course).

Foundations of Ethics, Thursday nights 9pm-12am EDT from June 6-September 5 (13 week course)

Practical Ethics, Sundays 9-11:30am EDT from June 2-September 22 (16 week course)

Historical Philosophy, Aristotle to the Present, Sundays 12-2pm EDT from June 2-October 20 (20 week course with students already taking it who are presently finishing studying Plato with me. You would join us as we start Aristotle and continue on through the rest of the history of philosophy. If you want, we can do special sessions on Plato for two or three weeks right after the normal class is over.)

Practical Ethics, Friday evenings 5:15-7:45pm EDT from July 6-October 26 (16 week course) [Read more...]

Hammer Out Your Philosophy Face to Face with Dr. Daniel Fincke This Summer

Daniel Fincke Red Couch

In this post I report back on how my online classes have been going and link to this new survey which you can fill out if you would like me to teach you philosophy or give you philosophical counseling this summer and/or fall. It’s like reading Camels With Hammers, but instead you’re learning from and arguing with me directly, systematically, and face to face, for a couple hours a week. [Read more...]

The Letter That Will Probably Get Me Fired

In this post, with his gracious permission, I have reposted in full Monte Abbott’s blog post “The Letter That Will Probably Get Me Fired” which originally appeared on his blog Gay Pentecostal Atheist. For many of my own ruminations on my own situation as an adjunct professor, read my post from the beginning of this school year “The Underemployment Crisis and Me”. [Read more...]

How I Teach People To Play Chess

When I teach people to play chess, I make it so I can legitimately win or legitimately lose, and also win either way. [Read more...]

Training Students To Think For Themselves

This summer a wise older philosophy professor was railing about being asked by his administration to specify for each of his courses what the “learning outcomes” would be. He was, essentially, being asked to indicate what the students were going to learn. He found the suggestion preposterous. He insisted he couldn’t know what the students were going to learn. His job was not to predetermine what the students were going to learn. He might know what the basic subject matters and materials of his courses would be; but what would the students learn from them? How could he know that in advance, if they were going to be thinking for themselves, rather than merely regurgitating information? [Read more...]


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