Green Burial Interview

The “Forecast Earth” program on the Weather Channel recently aired a segment on green burials; they interviewed Billy and Kimberley Campbell of Memorial Ecosystems, who are managing the Honey Creek Woodlands green cemetery at the Monastery of the Holy Spirit.

Although Honey Creek Woodlands is on land owned by the monastery, it is an ecumenical burial site where people of any faith (or none) may be buried. For someone like me, though, it’s ideal: to be buried on monastery land, in an ecologically responsible way. Granted, dying and getting buried are at the very bottom of my to-do list, but it’s comforting to know that when I finally kick the bucket, I’ll have someplace so wonderful to go where I can push up the daisies (all organic, of course) in style.

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  • http://naturalburial.coop Mike salisbury

    Natural Burial Around the World

    The modern concept of natural burial began in the UK in 1993 and has since spread across the globe. According to the Centre for Natural Burial, there are now several hundred natural burial grounds in the United Kingdom and half a dozen sites across the USA, with others planned in Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and even China.

    A natural burial allows you to use your funeral as a conservation tool to create, restore and protect urban green spaces.

    The Centre for Natural Burial provides comprehensive resources supporting the development of natural burial and detailed information about natural burial sites around the world. With the Natural Burial Co-operative newsletter you can stay up-to-date with the latest developments in the rapidly growing trend of natural burial including, announcements of new and proposed natural burial sites, book reviews, interviews, stories and feature articles.

    The Centre for Natural Burial

  • http://memorialecosystems.com Billy Campbell

    The only correction I would make to Mike’s comment is that “conservation burial”, that is natural burial where the idea is to apply modern conservation science to protect and or restore a significant piece of land as a functioning nature preserve, was Memorial Ecosystem’s innovation, and it occurred before we were aware of the work in Great Britain (so it did not “spread” from there). I still have (some) of the correspondence with the founder of what was then called the Natural Burial Centre, where we advocated standards for ensuring that burials did more than “not waste resources”.

    I published the idea for conservation burial in 1988; a copy of the article is on our web site.

    Billy C

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/carlmccolman/ Carl McColman

    I’m not too worried about who did what first, I’m just glad it’s being done!


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