Do Contemplatives Need Bible Software?

Exegetical Guide for Psalm 65:1, which shows how the word "silence" is ignored in the NRSV translation. The Hebrew original reads "Silence is praise to you, O God," but  the anemic NRSV translation renders the verse is "Praise is due to you, O God."

Is the Bible a textbook, or a legal code, or a love letter?I suppose one could argue that it is all three. But it seems that, for much of Christian history, our theologians have tended to lock themselves away in an ivory tower, reading the Bible like a textbook, while church authorities (and their secular counterparts) have too often seen the book as merely a juridical text, meant to enforce morality and good order. Lost in the shuffle is the Bible as an amazing love story, full of poetry … [Read more...]

More Thoughts for a Small Contemplative Community

First of all, I'm really pleased at all the wonderful ideas and expressions of support for the idea I blogged about yesterday. I don't think I have it in me to start a network of contemplative groups throughout metro Atlanta, though! Besides, Contemplative Outreach has already done that. I'd rather start small and see where the Spirit takes us from there.Here's just another thought or two that came to me yesterday, after I made the initial post.While I'm really interested in having a group … [Read more...]

Kings and Gods

Daniel Berrigan didn't just go away when the Viet Nam war ended. He's still around, and at 87, still teaching and writing.His new book is called The Kings and their Gods: The Pathology of Power. It's a Bible Study of I and II Kings, looking at some of the lessons in those Old Testament books concerning political power — and, in true Berrigan style, he asks some hard questions about how those ancient lessons are relevant to our perilous times … [Read more...]

The Charter of Christian Mysticism

Mysticism's detractors often accuse it of being "un-biblical" or "extra-biblical." Mysticism cannot be an authentic element of Christian spirituality, so their reasoning goes, since it is not found in the Bible.True, the word mysticism does not occur in the Bible. But it is related to the Greek word mysterion, translated in most English versions as "mystery." If we think of mysticism as the spirituality of the Christian mystery, we are much closer to finding its scriptural … [Read more...]