Holy Wells: “Icons” of Celtic Spirituality

In my last post I made several references to Holy Wells as thin places. From the Chalice Well in western England, to Tobernault in northwest Ireland, to countless wells throughout the Celtic lands dedicated to St. Brigid or other much loved saints — Holy Wells (water sources that serve as places of prayer and veneration) are icons of the Celtic spirit.There is no “standard” Holy Well — they come in many forms. Some are wells are in the traditional sense, complete with round walls surrounding … [Read more...]

Thin Places: Are they Celtic, pre-Celtic, or Universal?

I first heard of the notion of Thin Places the first time I visited Glendalough, the ancient monastery nestled in a glacial valley south of Dublin. We were there on a crisp October day, the forest filled with hardwoods dancing with autumn colors. Even as I stood in the carpark after first arriving, I could sense something special about the place; and when our tourguide told us about “thin places,” my eyes danced with the gleam of recognition.“Glendalough is a thin place,” he said. “What i … [Read more...]

The Three Streams of Celtic Spirituality (and Three Lessons We Learn from it)

Friends, I am in the process of writing a book about Celtic spirituality. This will be the first book on Celtic wisdom that I have written since becoming a Catholic in 2005. Over the next few weeks I hope to post excerpts from the manuscript to this blog, both to share with you what's on my mind these days but also to garner any comments or feedback you'd like to share. Please remember that this is "unvarnished" writing — the book itself will be carefully edited and revised, so the text that you … [Read more...]

How the Deserts of Egypt Inspired the Saints of Ireland

In the Celtic lands, you’ll find places with names like Dysart or Dysert. There’s Dysart in Scotland, a suburb of Kirkcaldy, where a Celtic holy man named St. Serf once lived. Or there’s Dysert O’Dea in Co. Clare, Ireland, the site of a monastery said to have bene founded by St. Tola in the eighth century.Others can be found, sprinkled across the land, often with some sort of connection to a saint or monastery of old.These places are named for the Gaelic word díseart, which means “hermita … [Read more...]

A Contemplative Faith — with a Gaelic Accent!

Friends, 2017 is shaping up to be the year of Celtic spirituality for me. I hope you'll join me in exploring this lovely dimension of Christian wisdom.What, exactly, is Celtic Christianity? Sure, it's the spirituality found in books like John O'Donohue's Anam Cara or Esther de Waal's Every Earthly Blessing, among many others. But still: what is it?The easiest answer to this question is: the distinctive spirituality of the Celtic peoples, which includes the people of Ireland, Scotland, Wal … [Read more...]

Why I Love the Carmina Gadelica (Despite Its Flaws)

You are the joy of all joyous things, You are the light of the beam of the sun, You are the door of the chief of hospitality, You are the surpassing star of guidance, You are the step of the deer of the hill, You are the step of the steed of the plain, You are the grace of the swan of swimming, You are the loveliness of all lovely desires. — "The Invocation of the Graces" from the Carmina Gadelica (modernized language) I recently have acquired a copy of the latest edition of the Ca … [Read more...]

Remembering John O’Donohue

I am saddened to have learned of the passing of John O'Donohue, author of Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom, yesterday (January 4, 2008). He died peacefully in his sleep while on holiday in France. Read the announcement on his website.In 1999 I had the privilege to interview him for a book industry trade publication; you can read the interview below this announcement.He was not only one of the most articulate voices of living Celtic Christianity and Celtic wisdom, but he also had a … [Read more...]