Honorable Mention: Justice for Women

The denomination to which I belong, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, has a constitutional mandate informing its Justice for Women program:

  • to work to enable this church to realize the full participation of women,
  • to create equal opportunity for women of all cultures,
  • to foster partnership between men and women,
  • to assist this church to address sexism, and
  • to advocate justice for women in this church and society.

To that end, the denomination has just begun the process of developing a new social statement on Justice for Women.  I can think of few things more deserving of theological, social, and political attention after the political year we have almost survived.

This is an important expansion of the types and kinds of faiths and churches that are visibly part of the public discourse around gender justice right now.  The program’s website contains a host of educational resources that are theological, sociological, political, academic, and accessible.

Additionally, the program embodies the kind of intersectionality that is essential for any serious twenty-first century work on inequalities and advocacy for justice.

“The Justice for Women program is shaped by the unique voices and experiences of a multitude of women across race, ethnicity, ability, class, sexuality and age.  It is with this rich foundation that we work to:

All of these activities nourish the work and service of this church.”

Because the intersection of human identity includes religion as well as all of these other dimensions of our gendered, raced, and embodied lives, the ELCA’s Justice for Women program is a great partner in this work.

 

Author note:  ‘Honorable Mention’ is a recurring feature on this blog … a quick mention/shout-out to someone or something worth noting.

 

About Caryn Riswold

Caryn D. Riswold is a feminist theologian in the Lutheran tradition. She is Professor of Religion and Chair of Gender and Women’s Studies at Illinois College in Jacksonville, Illinois, where she has worked for over a decade teaching undergraduates to think critically and creatively about religion. She earned her Ph.D. and Th.M. from the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, holds a master’s degree from the Claremont School of Theology, and received her B.A. from Augustana College in her childhood hometown of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X