Mag, Issue #3: Reconsidering Manhood, Confronting Our Own Privilege, and More!

While our magazine launched two weeks ago, this issue represents the first of many issues that contain top-notch content exclusive to the magazine format. You’ll only be able to read these features in the iPad and iPhone app, so make sure you download and subscribe now! (there’s a free trial if you’re uncertain. You’ll love it.)

This issue, Ben Bartlett explores his struggles with what it means to be a real man:

Today, as an adult, I see women kicking men’s butts in every phase of education, in many industries, and in nearly every job that requires schooling. They are generally more disciplined, more conscientious, more observant, and more detailed. They think just as fast, work just as hard, and care just as much as any man ever has. And they have done this while maintaining their traditionally central role in management of the home.

All this makes me wonder if the hero I longed to be as a boy is still needed—or wanted—today. Are those days gone?

Also in this issue, Brad Williams is confronted with a stark picture of privilege:

I noticed that the people of color had the hardest jobs, and that they all came from depressed economies. The waiter in charge of putting my napkin in my lap at dinner was from India. The waitress in charge of filling my water glass was from Columbia. The shopkeeper across from our room was from Mexico. The guy who cleaned my room was also from India, the other guy on my hall who cleaned rooms was from one of the islands. The guys hawking margaritas on the deck all day were also people of color. And they were all smiling all the time, even when they cracked my lobster tail for me.

In addition to these exclusive features, this issue includes a Michael Scott retrospective, a coming to terms with The Great Gatsby, a meditation on Denison Witmer, a consideration on psychopathy, and the regular “Common Graces” feature which offers up five recommendations for your popular culture enjoyment–all in a pleasant-to-read package.

In case you missed the original post explaining the idea behind the magazine, you can read all about it here.

About Richard Clark

Richard H. Clark is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Christ and Pop Culture. He has a Master of Arts in Theology and the Arts from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He lives in Louisville, Ky. He is also the managing editor of Gamechurch and a freelance writer for Unwinnable, Paste, and other outlets.
E-mail: clarkrichardh [at] gmail [dot] com.
Twitter: @deadyetliving