A Decade of Wardrobe Malfunctions: Social Media and Pseudo-Adulthood

Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake perf

by Justin PhillipsOn February 1, 2004, Justin Timberlake made good on his promise – well partially – to have Janet Jackson “naked by the end of this song.” Timberlake’s mea culpa for his Super Bowl performance included the enigmatic phrase “wardrobe malfunction,” which proved to be an achievement of linguistic genius. The phrase offered a way to acknowledge the existence, and even the telos, of zippers, buttons and Velcro, while never claiming any ownership of their proper operation (even if … [Read more...]

The Big Chop: A Theology of Natural Hair

Natural Hair

On Jan. 13, Tamera Mowry-Housely, co-host of The Real (and formerly one half of ABC's Sister, Sister and E!'s Tia & Tamera), took to social media to rave about her new haircut. Posting an Instagram photo with an accompanying tweet reading, "Love my big chop...love my curl doctor @shaiamiel You did it again." Mowry was quickly hailed a role model for young women of color. She even received a congratulatory tweet from Dark and Lovely, a giant in the multibillion-dollar African-American hair i … [Read more...]

Ask Uncle Brad: The Persecution Complex, The Snapchat Ghost, and Charity

2014-01-24 10.28.12

Ask Uncle Brad is a weekly column in which pastor, farmer, and father, and Christ and Pop Culture writer Brad Williams answers your questions about how to navigate difficult and complex cultural issues in everyday life.If you’d like to ask Uncle Brad a question, you can leave a comment below, or email your question to christandpopculture@gmail.com with the subject line, “Ask Uncle Brad”. I didn't get any questions sent directly to me this week, but I did get a lot of questions by way of s … [Read more...]

Virtual Choices, Real Effects: The Impact of Our Hyperlink Trail

fork-in-the-road

“...we always pay dearly for chasing after what is cheap.” —Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag ArchipelagoRobert Frost’s most recognizable poem is probably his most misunderstood. Despite popular opinion, “The Road Not Taken” is not an anthem to the individual or a smug reflection on the speaker’s decision-making acumen. Rather, it’s a meditation on time, mortality, and finitude. It’s about human limitations. Two roads diverge but only one can be taken. At the crucial decision point, Frost may … [Read more...]

Flowers in the Attic and the Allure of the Dark

flowersintheattic

As a preteen girl, my reading diet was rather heavy on empty calories found in glossy teen-romance books. The Sweet Valley High series was a mainstay, the storylines giving shape to the hope and angst I felt but was too young to name for myself. I liked that troubles always worked out in the end and that the girl always got the guy. These were simple, easy reads, depicting how I wished my life would go. I read them until one fateful day, when my quick-witted aunt grabbed a copy to see what I was … [Read more...]

#Instagrown: In an Age of Instantaneous Everything, What Happens to Adolescent Yearning?

Adolescent Yearning

Adolescence is a matter of restlessness. It is a churning, writhing cesspool of desire. No, not that kind of desire - not entirely. Mostly, it is the recognition of this pull toward adulthood, the acknowledgment that something is ahead, above, beyond what has already been known and experienced. That elusive something seems bound up in money, making out, and mystery, with a little flash and smoke. The hallmark of this formative chapter is that maturity, adulthood, that something, is close enough … [Read more...]

My Son’s Martin Luther King Day Question: “Daddy, Can We Teach the Bad Guys Goodness?”

medium_5796538977

  My five-year-old recently reminded me, quite emphatically, that he didn't have school on Monday because of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. He was, of course, simply excited to have a day off from kindergarten. But this seemed to be a perfect “teachable moment,” so I sat my kids down to tell them a little bit about the holiday’s namesake. But where do you start with someone like King?I suppose starting with the evils he fought against is as good a place as any. And so I told them that there we … [Read more...]

Brain Death and Dialogue: What Two News Stories Can Teach Us about Responding with Grace

APphoto_Brain Dead Pregnancy

by Amber Stamper Have you ever obsessed over a news story? Become totally and personally invested? Glutted yourself on coverage? Set Google alerts? Consumed every report—mainstream, local, liberal, conservative, print, radio, TV, Web—you could access? Endlessly scanned comment threads, blogs, and social media commentary?If—like me—you have, you might have expected to eventually gain quite a bit of expertise on the subject. Instead, what you likely found was that source overload can lead to a … [Read more...]

Ask Uncle Brad: “My Dad is a Culture Warrior” (Plus: Daniel Diet, Correcting the Internet)

2014-01-16 09.37.04

Ask Uncle Brad is a weekly column in which pastor, farmer, and father, and Christ and Pop Culture writer Brad Williams answers your questions about how to navigate difficult and complex cultural issues in everyday life.If you'd like to ask Uncle Brad a question, you can leave a comment, or email your question to christandpopculture@gmail.com with the subject line, "Ask Uncle Brad". Uncle Brad, Whenever I return home for the holidays, it is inevitable that my father and I will end up ar … [Read more...]

How the Church Resegregated Schools in the South

How the Church Resegregated Schools in the South

To give you a taste of the kind of content found in each issue of Christ and Pop Culture Magazine, each day for the next two weeks, we’ll be counting down our ten favorite features from the magazine in 2013, allowing you the rare opportunity to read each exclusive magazine feature in full. For more features like this, download the magazine for iPad and iPhone from Apple’s Newstand.  Number 2: We like to imagine that segregation is ancient history. Tyler Glodjo reminds us it's not.“Look! … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X