Ron Paul: Seriously?

In the midst of a relatively unpredictable and discouraging selection of Republican nominees, Ron Paul stands out. For some, he represents a shining beacon of true American values. For others, he's merely a distraction from the true candidates. Either way, Paul has inspired a significant amount of debate about the nature of elections, the need for uncompromising truth in the midst of pandering candidates, and the Christian's duty to vote with wisdom and discernment. Unfortunately, like most … [Read more...]

Watching Politics From the Pew: Debates and Truth

Each week in Watching Politics From the Pew, Benjamin Bartlett offers a thoughtful Christian perspective on the latest political happenings in the news.One thing Christians ought to love is truth.  Truth is about knowing what is actually real rather than a twisted, disproportional version of events.  Truth is about cutting past lies people tell each other and themselves.  Truth is about saying what is and responding appropriately.I think one of the most discouraging things about watching pol … [Read more...]

Citizenship Confusion: 9/11 and the Complexity of the World

Every Monday in Citizenship Confusion, Alan Noble discusses how we confuse our heavenly citizenship with citizenship to the state, culture, and the world.The more I research subjects and learn, live in community and observe people, experience life and grow old, the more I have become aware of the frightening complexity of everything. And, more disturbingly, the more I have become aware of how profoundly dangerous attempts to simplify and reduce complexity can be to ideas, peoples, and nations. … [Read more...]

Watching Politics From the Pew: Hypocrisy

Each week in Watching Politics From the Pew, Benjamin Bartlett offers a thoughtful Christian perspective on the latest political happenings in the news.Hypocrisy is a funny thing.  It has to be one of the easiest accusations known to man.  All you have to do is find something someone says, find an action that somehow contradicts it, and then accuse the person of being a, “hypocrite.”  This is especially true in politics, where any explanation of your actions that takes more than two sentences … [Read more...]

Citizenship Confusion: The New York Times' Religious Quiz for Presidential Candidates

Every Monday in Citizenship Confusion, Alan Noble discusses how we confuse our heavenly citizenship with citizenship to the state, culture, and the world.One of the reoccurring themes of my column has been the fact that Christians must always place the authority and honor of God above the State.  But what is a devoted Christian presidential candidate to say when asked, "If you encounter a conflict between your faith and the Constitution and laws of the United States, how would you resolve it? H … [Read more...]

Watching Politics from the Pew: Some Thank-yous

This week, Ben Bartlett introduces his new column on politics: Watching Politics from the Pew.Politics are front and center these days for reasons both bad and... well, worse.  The economy, the presidential election, and a host of other issues are consuming large portions of the front page seemingly every day.  So, I'll be setting aside my "On the Other Hand," posts for a while to focus on politics.  We'll call this, "Watching Politics From the Pew," and I'm going to try to use the column to ta … [Read more...]

Citizenship Confusion: WORLD Magazine's Editorial Cartoons

Every Monday in Citizenship Confusion, Alan Noble discusses how we confuse our heavenly citizenship with citizenship to the state, culture, and the world.I recently visited WORLD's Editorial Cartoon page after reading some praise about it and was struck with how similar their cartoons were to those of other publications. They featured caricatures of politicians with grotesque features that dehumanized them and mocked their competence. They reduced complex political issues into absurd and s … [Read more...]

Clarity and Charity: Bachmann's Faith and Christian Community

The Iowa Straw Poll is pointless. Or is it? On the one hand, it distributes no delegates for a party's Presidential nomination, its voter involvement encompasses less than twenty thousand persons, and the entire event is seen as a glorified fundraiser for the Iowa GOP. On the other hand, the Iowa Straw Poll does matter. It tests the enthusiasm and organizational skill of the participating candidates. It can pull the plug on a struggling campaign, as it did for former Minnesota Governor Tim … [Read more...]

On the Other Hand: Designing Your Political BS Filter

Each week in On the Other Hand, Ben Bartlett defies the common wisdom and identifies the other side of the story of cultural hot-topic issues. The world is full of BS.  You know this, I know this, everyone knows this.  And we all know politics in general and political races in particular are great examples of meaningless talk and unimportant sparring. Further, if you are anything like 84% of your friends and family, you are none too happy with your lawmakers at this point in time.  A time in whi … [Read more...]

Citizenship Confusion: Bachmann, Schaeffer, Pearcey, and Private Faith

Every Monday in Citizenship Confusion, Alan Noble discusses how we confuse our heavenly citizenship with citizenship to the state, culture, and the world.Last week, The New Yorker published an article by Ryan Lizza which revealed the "exotic influences on [Michele Bachmann's] thinking." One of those influences was Frances Schaeffer and another was Nancy Pearcey, a student of Schaeffer's. While I am no fan of Bachmann politically, it is fairly obvious that this New Yorker article is a "hack … [Read more...]


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