Dag Hammarskjold and the Importance of Reflection by Micah Wimmer

Micah Wimmer

This post is written in conjunction with the “Becoming a Public Scholar-Activist” course and is directed by Monica A. Coleman. In the United States, the tortured artist has become an idealized archetype of sorts for many, taking on a bizarre type of cultural cache. Sylvia Plath’s suicide is construed as romantic, Ernest Hemingway’s as a [Read More...]

Public Scholarship and Activism in Today’s World – Monica A. Coleman

Monica A. Coleman

I went to divinity school with a calling to ministry, but unsure if that meant being the lead pastor of a local church or … something else. A couple years later, I was a minister and survivor of sexual violence and I found myself with a show-string budget leading an effort that offered a church response to sexual violence. I was on the ground with survivors, police, pastors, social workers and rape crisis centers trying to break silences about how rape, incest and sexual abuse affect our faith. Years later, I wrote a book about this work with the hope that other churches and crisis centers could learn from the experiences I had in Nashville, Tennessee. Before I knew it, I was speaking and teaching about this work and the book in churches and conferences around the country. As a young religious scholar, I hoped to write books that would transform how people understood faith and theology. I had no preparation for what it meant to be this public with my activism or scholarship. [Read more...]

Displaying the Ten Commandments in the Public Sphere: Even When it is Unconstitutional it is Constitutional (by Matt Bussell)

PhD student Matt Bussell

This post is written in conjunction with the “Religion and Law in the U.S.” course dialogue project and is directed by Grace Yia-Hei Kao. On June 27, 2005 the United States Supreme Court ruled on two court cases dealing with displays of the Ten Commandments: McCreary County v. ACLU (http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/545/03-1693/) and Van Orden v. Perry [Read More...]

Skiing With Jesus May Not Be Illegal – But Could It Be Unconstitutional? (by Saul Barcelo)

Photo by Carley Jane (Flickr)

This post is written in conjunction with the “Religion and Law in the U.S.” course dialogue project and is directed by Grace Yia-Hei Kao. For the last  59 years, skiers in the Whitehead Ski Resort in Montana have had the privilege of skiing along Jesus Christ for no extra cost.  However, that could change in [Read More...]

ACLU Hopes to Draw “Bright Line” Between Religion & Secular, Charter Schools (by Katie Kubitskey)

MA student Katie Kubitskey

This post is written in conjunction with the “Religion and Law in the U.S.” course dialogue project and is directed by Grace Yia-Hei Kao. It’s not often that one sees a conservative Christian journalist and a church-state watchdog organization playing for the same team. However, the two joined forces in 2009 to raise a case [Read More...]

Easter: A Reflection by John Cobb

John B. Cobb, Jr., Ph.D., has held many positions including Ingraham Professor of Theology at the Claremont School of Theology, Avery Professor at the Claremont Graduate School, Fullbright Professor at the University of Mainz, Visiting Professor at Vanderbilt, Harvard, and Chicago Divinity Schools. His writings include: Christ in a Pluralistic Age; God and the World; [Read More...]

The Inherent Tension in Law and Religion (by William H. Floyd)

This post is written in conjunction with the “Religion and Law in the U.S.” course dialogue project and is directed by Grace Yia-Hei Kao. There’s an old saw about prayer in schools which seems to have originated among liberal politicians in the 1980s: As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in [Read More...]

Pushing the Edges: New Media and Religious Communities (by Hannah Heinzekehr)

campbell

This post is written in conjunction with the “Becoming a Public Scholar” course and is directed by Monica A. Coleman. In February, Goshen College, a Mennonite-affiliated liberal arts school, announced that it was going to be launching its new iCore Technology initiative by offering a new IPad 3 to every incoming freshman in fall 2012. [Read More...]

Endorsing Religion? Obama Administration argues for Cross on Public Land (by Katrina Myers)

Katrina Myers

This post is written in conjunction with the “Religion and Law in the U.S.” course dialogue project and is directed by Grace Yia-Hei Kao. Last week the Obama administration asked the Supreme Court to allow a 43-foot-tall cross that serves as a war memorial on public land to remain atop Mt. Soledad in San Diego.  [Read More...]

Does Your Mom Get It? (by Sheri Kling)

pitch perfect

This post is written in conjunction with the “Becoming a Public Scholar” course and is directed by Monica A. Coleman. Just the other day, during a panel discussion on “Creating Women’s Theology,” Dr. Monica A. Coleman (who co-authored a book by the same name) said this was the first of her texts that her mother [Read More...]


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