Would total transparency be so bad?

Conversations with God spoke many years ago of humans living life in total transparency, and it said that this would be the chosen and preferred lifestyle of every truly evolved society.

There is, among people who are living at the highest level of integrity, among those who are moving through their days and nights and in accordance with the purpose and agenda of their soul, no reason for any secrets to be kept from anyone.

Not a telephone record, not a purchase receipt, not list of books ordered online or a credit card statement or a bank account balance or a tax filing or any data about us whatsoever need be kept from the public eye — nor would anyone want it to be unavailable to anyone else.

There is no reason for everyone not to know everything about us, unless we have something to hide.

The reason that giant corporations, major institutions, and governments hate it when things like WikiLeaks press releases happen, or revelations like the Guardian newspaper stories about telephone records occur, is that they all have something to hide.

Recently, news reports all over the Internet have been telling of a top secret court order that allegedly required the giant Verizon telephone service provider to release the private phone records of Americans to the U.S. Government’s National Security Agency every day until the 19th of July.

Politicians have been scrambling to take sides in the aftermath of the revelation, which has been the source of much commentary (such as this one) on blogs and talk radio and television news networks like CNN, which began one of its online reports with this lead paragraph…

“Frightening government overreach or valuable law enforcement tool? That’s the question politicians in Washington, and millions of citizens around the United States, asked on Thursday thanks to an explosive report suggesting that the government has been collecting millions of Americans’ phone records.”

U.S. President Obama sought to soothe the nerves of his nation’s electorate by saying at a press conference that no one’s personal phone calls had been listened to, and that only records of numbers called, the time logs of when numbers were called, the length of conversations and the like were among the data gathered.

A number of U.S. lawmakers, including U.S. Senators and members of Congress, rose to say that such data gathering had saved their country from at least one major terrorist attack that they know of — and could avert many more, if only by making it more difficult for persons around the world to use major U.S. calling networks as a communication means by which to lay plans for their assaults.

Others have loudly protested the data gathering as a Big Brother Is Watching You intrusion in private lives. Yet this raises an interesting question: Why does one need a private life? What information is so secret, or would be so embarrassing, that we have a need to keep it private? What if everyone knew everything about everyone? What would happen?

One thing that would happen is what we would find out that we are all not so very different from each other. The other thing we would discover is that most people are pretty accepting of others — and that those who aren’t would soon, in a completely transparent society, find themselves among the tiniest minority…and have a hard time explaining what they are doing there. The third thing we would find out is that Total Transparency does not work unless everyone is playing by the same rules. That includes government, corporations, organizations, and every individual.

Can or will that day ever come? It seems a long way off. And yet, we are told in Conversations with God that this is the most wonderful and mutually beneficial way to live — and that human society will, indeed, one day move to this model. How to get everyone to embrace the model simultaneously…that is the question.

  • Rebecca Trotter

    I always think about this when people complain about the “tmi” phenomenon. If people are comfortable enough to share the mundane, odd and icky parts of being human, that’s good, it seems to me.


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