<

Principle of Analogy

Bob Price, the Bible Geek

Some events are common in our everyday lives. When we see one of these, we know what bin to put it in. Other events are common, but only as legends–raising from the dead, for example. Here’s the principle behind this natural categorization. [Read more...]

Why Worry About a God That Isn’t There?

What should atheists call themselves?

You don’t call yourself an a-unicornist. Or an a-Santaist. Why should people without a god belief call themselves a-theists? [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: Non-Overlapping Magisteria (NOMA)

“Rocks of Ages,” by Stephen Jay Gould (1999)

Stephen Jay Gould proposed the idea of Non-Overlapping Magisteria to calm the warring camps of Science and Religion. Well … it was a nice try. [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: Dunning-Kruger Effect

Thomas Combe—probably a pretty smart guy

Has it ever seemed to you that less competent people rate their competence higher than it actually is, while more competent people humbly rate theirs lower? It’s not just your imagination. [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: Extraordinary Claims and Extraordinary Evidence

Dictionary+magnifying+glass

Carl Sagan popularized the aphorism, “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.” Apologist Greg Koukl (Stand to Reason) finds that too heavy a burden to carry and wants to lower the bar. Let’s see how well he does with that project. [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: Abiogenesis and Panspermia

An asteroid impacts a planet. (Might it have a living payload?)

Richard Dawkins has been lampooned in Creationist circles for his reference to panspermia as a possible origin of life on earth, but it solves more problems than the Creationists realize. [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: Legend, Myth, and More

How are legend and myth different? Doctrine and dogma? Religion and superstition? Let’s try to clarify some of these fundamental terms. [Read more...]

Dr Johnson: The Angel of Mons

Sure, legend can creep into a story—William Tell, King Arthur, and Robin Hood might have legendary elements. These stories happened long ago, so it’s hard to tell. But that never happens in the modern era, to modern people, right? Think again: the supernatural can indeed corrupt modern history. [Read more...]

Word of the Day: Russell’s Teapot

Before the Flying Spaghetti Monster, before the Invisible Pink Unicorn, was Bertrand Russell’s orbiting teapot. This is the classic thought experiment that exercises our ability to distinguish the plausibly real from the merely unfalsifiable. [Read more...]

Word of the Day: Shibboleth

This interesting Hebrew word means “torrent of water.” But that’s not what it really means. [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X