The Hilarious Violence of Grace

Grace is a nice idea until it happens to you. Theologian George Hunsinger writes, Grace does not mean continuity but radical discontinuity, not reform but revolution, not violence but nonviolence, not the perfecting of virtues but the forgiveness of sins, not improvement but resurrection from the dead. He continues, grace is not a matter of repairing [Read More...]

Why I Don’t Tally the “God” References at Political Conventions

I’m seeing a number of comparisons of the RNC and the DNC regarding the number of “God” references, and references to “Scripture” in speeches. Then there was that kurfuffle at the DNC about taking “God” out of the party platform, then re-inserting the language after it was put to the convention floor. I think God [Read More...]

Tony Jones is Doing Apologetics!

Emergent theologian Tony Jones is starting a new blog series called Questions that Haunt Christianity. He’s inviting readers to submit their vexing questions about the Christian faith on Tuesday of each week, and then he’ll answer them on Friday. Jones says, “I’m not afraid of doubt. I, myself, am a doubter. But I consider a [Read More...]

Welcome to Cultivare, Kimberly Hyatt

I’d like to take a moment today to introduce you all to a new blogger here on Cultivare, Kimberly Hyatt. She’s started off with a bang. Her first post, “Look at the Christians. See How Mean they Are”, generated quite the buzz. If you haven’t read it yet, take a chance to do so. Here is her bio: [Read More...]

Jesus+Nothing=Everything & Theology of Culture

  When asked what he had learned from his years of studying the Bible, the great Swiss Reformed theologian of grace Karl Barth responded, “Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so.” The title of Tullian Tchividjian’s award-winning book, Jesus+Nothing=Everything, offers in similar Barthian fashion a reminder that the Christian faith [Read More...]

Cure for Christendom

I’m getting some great questions relating to yesterday’s post, “You Don’t Need Adam to Need a Savior, You Just Need Sin” (some great discussion, both in the comments on this blog and on Facebook). I’m rushing to complete a draft of my forthcoming book on Kierkegaard and emergent Christianity, however, and I really don’t have [Read More...]

The Kingdom is Near. In Orlando.

Today’s post is by Dr. Heather Curtis, Associate Professor of Religion, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. For most Americans, and especially for families with school-aged children, summer involves “vacation.”  As a historian, I’m always struck by what a recent invention the practice of taking an extended hiatus from work, school, and ordinary occupations is.  Like much of [Read More...]

Piss Christ, Revisited

The culture wars are back. And they seem to have a corporate sponsor that sells fried chicken sandwiches. With the Presidential election looming the political pundits are active, as are the Reformed and evangelical bloggers, girding themselves for battle, urging their minions not to retreat and fight for traditional middle American values in the face [Read More...]

The Artist, the Work of Art, and the Freedom of the Unfree Will

What is the relationship of the artist to the work of art?  Is it merely the result of the artist’s intentions and nothing more—a visual, literary, or musical message sent to the viewer that contains the artist’s emotions, thoughts, worldview? This is a question that has long perplexed critics and Charles McGrath’s recent article, “Good Art, [Read More...]

Robert Hughes, Jackson Pollock, and Me

  The art critic has an impossible but necessary task. I was reminded of this earlier this week after learning of the death of Robert Hughes, one of the most successful critics of our generation. The art critic’s task is impossible because he or she must use one medium of expression (words) to communicate the significance [Read More...]


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