The Dark Light of Thomas Kinkade

Hans Holbein the Younger, The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb, 1520-22, oil on panel, Öffentliche Kunstsammlung, Basel. In The Idiot (1869), Dostoyevsky’s Prince Mishkin notices a reproduction of Holbein’s Dead Christ on the wall in Rogozhin’s house, and observes that it has the power to make one lose their Christian faith. The [Read More...]

Gratitude to Ada María Isasi-Díaz

I learned earlier this week that one of my professors from graduate school  passed away.  Dr. Ada María Isasi-Díaz was Professor of Theology and Ethics at Drew University where I earned my PhD.  She taught the first class in my doctoral program in Christian Social Ethics, and I had her for my last class.   I [Read More...]

Ultra-Orthodox Jews and the Internet

Today, some 40,000 ultra-Orthodox, male Jews (women not allowed) are packing out Mets Stadium to learn how to harness the internet for good rather than for evil. This was according to this Washington Post article which ran yesterday. One can’t help but admire the collective concern for the real dangers of the internet and the ways [Read More...]

We Might as Well Work for Justice: Ada Maria Isasi-Díaz

Ada Maria Isasi-Díaz passed away this past weekend, on Mothers’ Day, after a struggle with cancer. She was a significant feminist, Latina theologian who taught theology for many years at Drew University. She coined a new discourse in feminist theology, mujerista theology, which sought to synthesize and put forward the voices of grassroots Latinas. This [Read More...]

A Church’s Expiration Date

Visiting with my grandmother in North Carolina, she bemoaned the decrease of her small Quaker church, fretting like many in her generation over the dearth of younger people in attendance. Without them, her little congregation is destined to wither away. It reminded me of an interesting idea I heard recently. What if churches were started [Read More...]

The Scream, a Stuffed Shark, and the Insecurity of Culture

Last week I took the opportunity of the record sale at auction of Edvard Munch’s masterpiece, The Scream (1895) to reflect on Munch and his work from a theological perspective. But the auctions themselves, which achieved record prices for several artists, raise their own set of theological questions that are more productive and interesting than most [Read More...]

Our Christian Identity Crisis

I am reading a book I am interested in using for a class in the Fall:  Mission After Christendom:  Emergent Themes in Contemporary Mission, edited by Ogbu Kalu, Peter Vethanayagamony, and Edmund Kee-Fook Chia (Westminster John Knox Press, 2010).  It is common to  take shots today at the notion of  Christendom brought about by Constantine’s [Read More...]

Everything Flows: God’s Breath and Human Bodies

I’ve been thinking about breath lately. Michelle Voss Roberts, in her fascinating book, Dualities: A Theology of Difference, spotlights the female, medieval spiritual writer, Mechthild of Magdeburg. Mechtild was fascinated by fluidity. Water flows. Blood flows. Air flows. God flows. Everything flows. Mechthild wrote, “Lord, between you and me there goes unceasingly an imperceptible breath in which [Read More...]

Jesus as An Avenger?

As a kid and a cartoonist, I drew quite a few superheros, the most fun part of which was coming up with the cool costumes. Now that The Avengers is out and grossing its expected millions, it made me wonder what kind of costume I might draw for Jesus as an Avenger (1 Thess 4:6). [Read More...]

The Scream

Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895 Last week one of Edvard Munch’s four versions of The Scream (1895) sold at auction for a record price of $120 million. An icon of modernism, The Scream was made by a truly great but complicated artist whose remarkable body of work produced throughout his sixty-year career put a sizable [Read More...]

The Art of Seeing

My husband (Mike) and I went to the Rembrandt exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art last week.  I am always intrigued when looking at great masters of art.  This was particularly so at this exhibit, where there were side-by-side comparisons of Rembrandt’s originals with artists who were schooled by Rembrandt.   Some differences were quite subtle, [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X