“LDS Charities Give Million-Dollar Humanitarian Effort for Syrian Refugees”

 

 

I’m absolutely delighted at this.

 

The Church’s humanitarian efforts are impressive and effective.  I’m told by very reliable sources, for example, that members of the Church would be extremely gratified if they knew the full story of how the Church helped out during recent crises in the Philippines.

 

They can always use more resources.

 

 

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  • Bob Powelson

    I have read your whitewash of Islamic excess in the DN.
    I would refer you to Huntington’s book the Clash of Civilizations, where he refers to Islam’s bloody borders. In today’s world nearly every hot spot where killing is going on, has Islam on one or both sides. The exceptions I can think of off hand are Korea and Columbia.
    Does Islam as practiced in the world today, really have any redeeming qualities?
    That said; the LDS help in Syria is a good thing. Perhaps it can be directed to the Druze.

    • danpeterson

      First of all, I don’t whitewash “Islamic” excess. If you can find a case where I’ve lamented the death of ‘Usama b. Ladin or Abu Mus‘ab al-Zarqawi, justified the Taliban, legitimated 9-11, or put in a good word for al-Qa‘ida, I hope you’ll provide it.

      Second, I bought and read Professor Huntington’s book as soon as it appeared, and I’m not unsympathetic to his viewpoint.

      Third, I’m serenely confident, and very happy, that the leaders of my Church don’t share your apparent view that, because of their religious faith, we shouldn’t provide assistance to suffering Muslim widows and orphans.

    • http://nathanrichardson.com Nathan000000

      Amen, Dan. If any Latter-day Saint wants to know what our opinions and actions should be regarding Muslims, follow the Brethren. Watch what they do and say about Muslims, and you’ll quickly find it incompatible with a lot of the harsh generalizations prevalent in American conversation.

  • Bob Powelson

    With limited funds, even a million dollars, put it where it will do the most good. I suggested the Druze.

    In 1967 I was only a few years out of the Canadian Army. I volunteered to go to Israel and did so. I was a couple of days late for the war, but did some other work that likely paid off in the Yom Kippur war. I might further recommend a careful reading of Orson Hyde’s dedicatory prayer for the return of the Jews to the land of Jerusalem.

    The question remains, does Islam have any redeeming qualities as a religious philosophy?

    What I saw there was a revelation, the stark ignorance and religious hate fueled Islamic excess was evident. I am active LDS and have been fully active since I was 19.

    • danpeterson

      You seem to imagine that I think that everything in the Islamic world today is hunky dory, without blemish or flaw.

      I’ve never suggested anything of the sort.

      Does Islam offer anything of value, though? Yes. It gives meaning and purpose and comfort to hundreds and hundreds of millions of people, and has done so for centuries. And its philosophers, scientists, and other writers have contributed enormously to human civilization.

      And, by the way, I’m quite familiar with Orson Hyde’s prayer. Don’t presume that those who disagree with you do so only because they’re ignorant.

    • Beth’s husband

      I’m sorry. Where does it say in Brother Hyde’s prayer that it is OK for returning Israelis to use Guerrilla warfare and suicide bombers, as well as act extremely brutal to their enemies, to achieve the goal of returning to the Holy Land?

      Don’t get me wrong – I’m not pro/anti Israel/Palestine Muslims/Christians/Jews, but I am pro-living Gospel principles. I don’t think Brother Hyde’s prayer gives a free pass for the violence in that section of the World, whatever the side. Sometimes I think we confuse fulfillment of prophecy as something that is justified. I believe God wants his children to get along and live truth than kill each other.

      • danpeterson

        I’m not sure to whom you’re responding. If it’s to me, I’ll just say that I certainly don’t read Elder Hyde’s prayer as authorizing murder or injustice.

        • Beth’s husband

          I apologize for the ambiguity. I was responding to Mr. Powelson.

          • danpeterson

            Ah. Thanks.

  • Bob Powelson

    Here we go again:
    In my opinion the dedication of the “land of Jerusalem” for the return on the Jews was the prophetic basis for the Zionist movement. The timing is most interesting, it also compliments the Book of Mormon’s concern for the Jews.

    The Zionist movement received serious impetus from the Balfour Declaration> Contrary to a lot of biased ideas the Jews did not brutally disposses the Palestinians but developed undeveloped lands, bought other lands (many from Turkish absentee landlords). Then in a great mistake the Brits managed to get Haj Amin al Husseini put in as Mufti of Jerusalem. This very nasty piece of work wound up in Germany during WWII and advised the Nazis on the Holocaust. The next wave of Jews were the survivors of the Holocaust, they were met with undisguised enmity.

    The Brits chose sides, the British Labour Government was quite anti-Semitic (Bevan) and when they finally left Palestine tried to make sure that the Palestinians got most of the weapons they left (the Jews managed to “steal” a good portion of them). The Jews did indeed use guerilla warfare and were at times brutal although not nearly as brutal as the Arab nations that gathered against.

    Israel prevailed in 1948/49, 1956, 1967, 1973 and various intifadas an other moves since then. I cite this on the basis that he who does not learn history is doomed the repeat it (Churchill) I think.

    A few miscellaneous points. The Crusades were not an attack of Islam. They were a counterattack.
    For some reason (perhaps Atilla the Hun) the Arab world seems to still be stuck in the 11th century. What is left seems to be barbaric and angy – 1948/49 as the catastrophe. It is not a culture/religion to be emulated. Pitied perhaps.

    By the way, my History Degree is from BYU in 1969, my law degree is from a Canadian law school.

  • http://bethandherspinrad.blogspot.com Beth

    Someday, the Church will be let into the Islamic world . The extent to which Muslims accept the message of the gospel in the future is dependent on how much we, as followers of Christ, treat Muslims with respect -as human beings and children of God – today. Snide remarks on the internet won’t to make anyone want to invite the missionaries in. Kindness and respect will.

    The Gospel message is for everyone. Christ spent his time with sinners. Why shouldn’t we follow is example by showing compassion to everyone in need, regardless of race, creed, political affiliation, or religion?

  • Strategoi

    Exactly Beth.
    When I was a freshman in high school, we had a Druze foreign exchange student. If the majority of people in the Middle East are that way (which I think they are) it’s good that the church is helping out there.

  • Bob Powelson

    The Druze are generally persecuted by the Muslims, Israel recognizes them and one of the even served as an interim President of Israel.

    In Utah and the US and most westen nations, generally, the Muslims are allowed to prosletyse. We cannot do so in Muslim countries. My daughter was on a mission in Montreal, she was physically assaulted by a Muslim man on a city bus, because some LDS missionary had talked to his wife. When these people get past basic barbarism it may improve.

  • Sikh Anon

    My LDS fast in August was for the people of Syria. I joined my Muslim friends for evening prayers and they invited me to share my thoughts afterwards at the front of the masjid. I gave my testimony of the return of Jesus ( Isa ).

  • http://nathanrichardson.com Nathan000000

    Sikh Anon, are you LDS or Muslim? That’s interesting that you had the opportunity to talk about Jesus in a Muslim meeting. How were your thoughts received?

  • http://www.bestmilliondollarbill.com Million Dollar

    I apologize for the ambiguity.


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