The history of Pre-Columbian America is all settled. We know who came and who was here, and there aren’t going to be any new surprises.

 

Some Amerindian faces
(Click to enlarge.)

 

As demonstrated here:

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Did-ancient-Polynesians-visit-California-Maybe-2661327.php#src=fb

 

And here:

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/11/131120-science-native-american-people-migration-siberia-genetics/

 

And, oh yes, the U.S. Patent Office can be closed now, as there won’t be many more new inventions or discoveries coming in.

 

 

  • mike

    Somewhere, Thor Hyerdahl is smiling…

  • Ray Agostini

    Where’s Simon Southerton when you need him? (Wink)

  • RaymondSwenson

    The article about the connection between Polynesian and coastal California Indian boat technology focuses on the Chumash tribes, but also mentions their neighbors, the Gabrielinos. The Gabrielino language is in the extensive Uto-Aztecan language group that includes Shoshone, Ute, Hopi, and Aztec languages. My recollection is that Uto-Aztecan linguist Brian Stubbs proposed that a large number of Uto-Aztecan words appear to be cognate to Hebrew or other Semitic languages.

    It strikes me that it must be a kick to be an historian, anthropologist, linguist or archeologist in the Spirit World, where you can actually talk to people from centuries ago and learn about their connections first hand.

  • kiwi57

    But Dan, haven’t you heard? DNA science has destroyed all possibility of defending the Book of Mormon, because there just can’t be any connection between ancient Americans and the Near East.

    Surely all that triumphalistic crowing can’t possibly have been premature, can it?

    • DanielPeterson

      It reminds me of all those who claimed that the murder of Joseph Smith would be the death of Mormonism, and of the Salt Lake Tribune’s confident assertion that the death of Brigham Young meant the end of Mormonism, and . . .

      Well, the current critics just want to “keep hope alive,” as the saying goes. They’re carrying on the tradition.


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