C. S. Lewis, and a Bequest from John Tvedtnes

 

Blake does Jacob's Ladder
William Blake, “Jacob’s Ladder” (1804); Wikimedia Commons public domain

 

This is one of my all-time favorite quotations, and it just so happens that it’s from one of my all-time favorite writers:

 

“It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which,if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and a corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in a nightmare.  All day long we are, in some degree, helping each other to one or the other of these destinations.  It is in the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and the circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all of our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics.  There are no ordinary people.  You have never talked to a mere mortal.  Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations — these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit — immortal horrors or everlasting splendors.”

C. S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

 

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And, while I’m thinking of C. S. Lewis, here are a couple of other favorites:

 

“There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, ‘Thy will be done,’ and those to whom God says, in the end, ‘Thy will be done.’  All that are in Hell, choose it.  Without that self-choice there could be no Hell.  No soul that seriously and constantly desires joy will ever miss it.  Those who seek find.  To those who knock it is opened.”

C. S. Lewis, The Great Divorce

 

“Imagine yourself as a living house. God comes in to rebuild that house. At first, perhaps, you can understand what he is doing. He is getting the drains right and stopping the leaks in the roof and so on; you knew that those jobs needed doing and so you are not surprised.  But presently he starts knocking the house about in a way that hurts abominably and does not seem to make sense.  What on earth is he up to?  The explanation is that he is building quite a different house from the one you thought of — throwing out a new wing here, putting on an extra floor there, running up towers, making courtyards. You thought you were going to be made into a decent little cottage: but he is building a palace. He intends to come and live in it himself.”

C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

 

There’s no question.  Lewis is, quite simply, awesomely good and almost endlessly quotable.

 

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A part of the legacy that our friend John Tvedtnes leaves behind is a website titled Book of Mormon Research.  I hope that some of you will take the time to sample what it has to offer:

 

Posted from Richmond, Virginia

 

 

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