Gagging on the Gospel Coalition: Why A Reflex Isn’t A Measure of Sin

When I had my wisdom teeth removed several years ago, I felt as if I was going to choke to death. Awake, but sedated, I kept gagging on something. It was something unnatural and awful. I was convinced a piece of my tooth had broken off and gotten caught in my throat. I became frantic, [Read More...]

A Back-to-School Liturgy That’s Not a Blessing of the Backpacks

Commonly, liturgical churches will do a back-to-school Blessing of the Backpacks. Usually, it is a simple, short blessing used in a Sunday Eucharist. But, for the purposes of junior and senior high students, I’ve always found them to be lacking something — honest engagement with how difficult and turbulent school can be for teenagers. So, [Read More...]

Animate:faith Isn’t Just for Young Adults (Review)

Sparkhouse’s animate:faith has one major flaw. And it’s a glaring one. It’s marketed for young adults. I was an early adopter of animate:faith. And by early adopter, I mean I signed up to be notified as soon the series became available for purchase. If memory serves, I ordered the series, if not the first day [Read More...]

Transforming Film into Contemplative Prayer: A Review of Thom Stark’s ‘Who Art in Heaven’

Director Thom Stark summarizes his award-winning film Who Art in Heaven simply: “A Man Prays.” But don’t let Stark deceive you, because if you do, he will devastate you in the best possible way. There is so much more going on in this eloquent and compact film than its tagline would have you believe, and the [Read More...]

The U.S. Supreme (Race) court: Roberts, Scalia and the Voting Rights Act

There is a wicked irony that as the United States marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement, the country’s highest court is edging closer to gutting one of the movement’s greatest victories. As Americans everywhere celebrate the marches, martyrs, and nonviolent courage of Civil Rights activists in Selma, Birmingham, Atlanta and elsewhere, the [Read More...]

On Our Behalf: Reclaiming Repentance As a Progressive Christian

This Lent, I will be exploring the evil done on our behalf for which the Episcopal liturgy calls us to repent.  For Lent, I’m repenting. And, as a progressive Christian, I’m also reclaiming repentance. Given Lent’s themes of penitence, it’s actually a season well-suited for progressives. Unfortunately, it is also season often marred by the [Read More...]

A Defiant Dance of Power, Not Sex: Beyoncé, the Super Bowl and Durga

If what you saw onstage last night at the Super Bowl’s halftime show was a singer wearing too little clothes, let me suggest it is says more about the eye of the beholder. If what you saw was a singer selling sex to the masses in a skimpy outfit, let me suggest you saw what [Read More...]

Tenebrae: A Service for Shadows and Grieving after Sandy Hook Shooting

Tomorrow, ministers across America will be addressing the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut. Sometimes, the best we can do is grieve together, and I hope that our churches, of all places, are sanctuaries that can honor, facilitate and express grief together. So, I put together a short service based on a Tenebrae service. [Read More...]

A Liturgy for Sept. 11 (Prayers of the People and a Litany of the Dead)

The 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks is Tuesday, and for those remembering that day, I wanted to offer a few prayers I wrote last year, as well as a visual prayer meditation. I hope you will find them challenging, moving and meaningful. The Prayers  Today, we pray with the remembrance of tragedy in [Read More...]

The Foolish Death of God

photo copyright Edu_Fon (Flickr)

Over the next week, I will be posting a three-part essay on the death of God, my experience of it, and my search for meaning through it. I know that much of what I write here intersects with the Death of God movement, but I also hope that I will add something to that conversation [Read More...]


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