"Westward leading, still proceeding…"

The Three Kings were following that “star of wonder, star of night,” but there may be more to it than that.  If you thought you knew all you wanted about the Magi, think again.

Elizabeth Scalia points us to a favorite book of hers, “Revelation of the Magi”:

I have referred to it as “a fast read that makes the heart soar,” and the book is certainly that; the illustrations are fascinating and enlightening, and the prose-voice praising God is not just lyrical, it is hypnotically joyful. It is joyful in the language of ancient prophecy, joyful at a depth even the New Testament only glimpses; it is the sort of skin-tingling joyfulness one sometimes experiences in a flash-fleeting instant of prayerful understanding that defies expression, and that makes the tale seem utterly authentic. We want to believe what is being shared in this manuscript, so long languished within the Vatican archives, because we love the light, and–in the image of the (unnamed) Christ as the very Star that Guides–the Revelation of the Magi harkens the reader repeatedly to a first antiphon of Lauds, “in your light, we see light itself.”

Apart from the engaging story and the excellent background provided by Landau, it is for the sheer beauty of this Adoration that I have already returned to this work several times. Landau’s translated text exposes the reader to the depths of a soul whose mystical acquaintance with the All Holy pulls one into the great gift of wide-open wonder. And, as Saint Gregory of Nyssa is credited as saying, “only wonder leads to knowing.”

Curious?   I know I am.  (When Elizabeth gushes about something, it’s always worthwhile.)  Read the rest — including an excerpt — here.

Comments

  1. More magic please . . . with big words if possible. It makes me feel almost rational!

  2. Deacon Norb says:

    Some time back, there was an evangelical Christian who decided to replicate the trip of the Magi — as best he could tell. He started in the territory south-east of Bagdad and went northwest, circled around through the “fertile crescent” and eventually came to Bethlehem. He walked most of the way. If my memory serves me, it took him about three months. What amazes me in many ways is that the modern nations along his path gave him little or no “red-tape.” Seach the web and you may find his story.

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  1. "Westward leading, still proceeding…" a look at the controversial "Revelation of the Magi" http://bit.ly/eEQaYf

  2. The Anchoress says:

    "Westward leading, still proceeding…" a look at the controversial "Revelation of the Magi" http://bit.ly/eEQaYf

  3. RT @TheAnchoress: "Westward leading, still proceeding…" a look at the controversial "Revelation of the Magi" http://bit.ly/eEQaYf

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