Quote of the day, on baseball

“Baseball is a game of inches. And hours. And in those moments between release and resolution are contained particles of infinity—the space between a prayer of supplication and the surrender of “Amen”; the whisper of intention that brings what is empty and void into fullness. The hope for redemption.

We can relate to that just as we can identify with pitcher and batter; the individual confronting a full team of resistance with the humblest of weapons—a ball, a stick—speaks to our daily grinds, the resistance, the persistence, the victory of getting through a day; of correcting a flawed stance; of breaking a bad habit before it owns you.

A man screaming “for the love of God” in the stands of Fenway Park made perfect and sympathetic sense to my son and me, because baseball may be a mere game, but it is one that relates to the continual process of the life of faith—a life of swings and misses, stupid errors, the clutch of despair, the release, the trust, the clockless innings of new chances that stretch out before us, endlessly, and so full of promise.

It breaks your heart, but it leaves you wanting more; it roars into spring, slips us through summer and delivers us, tired but still game, into autumn, and then we lie fallow—waiting in joyful hope.”

– Elizabeth Scalia.  Read the rest.

Comments

  1. …and this defines what it is like to be a life-long Dodgers fan!

  2. Irish Spectre says:

    You do realize that you have Bostonian frequenters to this site, good deacon, do you not? The timing of this particular post, what with the Sept. that the Sox are having, its worst month in terms of losses in over 50 years, standing now on the precipice of the recently unthinkable being done for the season as early as tomorrow night, suggests that you must’ve been out sick the week that your seminary syllabus was dedicated to the virtue of charity!!

  3. ” man screaming “for the love of God” in the stands of Fenway Park made perfect and sympathetic sense to my son and me, because baseball may be a mere game, but it is one that relates to the continual process of the life of faith—a life of swings and misses, stupid errors, the clutch of despair, the release, the trust, the clockless innings of new chances that stretch out before us, endlessly, and so full of promise.”

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m a baseball fan and lover of the game. But what makes baseball so different than other sports when it comes to faith? You can say the same thing about football, inserting fumbles, interceptions, penalties, missed extra points, and so on. And I bet you could do using basketball, hockey, golf, soccer, or any other sport. Sounds to me like the analogy is overly romanticized.

  4. Manny perhaps what makes it “different” is that baseball is HER love; enough said.

  5. I played baseball all the time as a kid, but as an adult, I can think no more boring spot to watch on tv than baseball (ok, except for soccer). And when I start figuring how many weeks, or months, I have to work to make what so-and-so just made for that one hit or catch, I go kinda numb inside. I haven’t been to a game since the Strike; not in protest, but just cuz there’s other more interesting things to enjoy out there. Like, you know, elevator music or something. Still, if fans like it, I say, Rejoice wherefore! Just don’t treat baseball like some kind of cultic karma key to the universe or something.

  6. Ed Peters,

    Too much study hath made thee mad! ;)

    Baseball is nature’s most nearly perfect game. Unlike football and hockey, it does not seek, nor condone with a wink and a nudge, violence between players. Unlike basketball and football, it does not require people of abnormal size to play it professionally. It is played at a pace which allows the viewer time to savor the action even before the slow motion replay.

  7. Wise words, O Gentle Philosopher! :)

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