Vatican Official Slams Modern Churches as “Museums, Spaces That Do Not Suggest Prayer…”

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Opposition is mounting in the Holy See to a spate of recent, ultra-modern churches, in Italy and abroad, by high profile architects.

“The lack of integration between the architect and the faith community has at times been negative,” said Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, head of the Vatican’s Pontificial Council for Culture. “Sometimes it goes wrong.”

Cardinal Ravasi said a church built in 2009 in Foligno, Italy (shown above) by the celebrated Italian architect Massimiliano Fuksas, which resembles a monolithic concrete cube, has been “highly criticised”.

In his native town of Merate in Lombardy, Cardinal Ravasi said the local priest needed to bring his own image of the Madonna to mass, because Mario Botta, the architect who designed the church, had not installed one.

“The problem is that in Catholicism, unlike Protestantism, things like the altar, the images, are essential, while architects tend instead to focus on space, lines, light and sound,” said Cardinal Ravasi.

The last architects to work closely with the church were back in the 17th century Baroque era, he added.

Cardinal Ravasi’s attack was backed last month by Antonio Paolucci, the head of the Vatican museums, when he spoke at the launch of a book celebrating the building of dozens of new churches in the suburbs of Rome since the 1990s.

Instead of praising the churches, Mr Paolucci lashed out, claiming that: “At best, these are like museums, spaces that do not suggest prayer or meditation.”

Cardinal Ravasi conceded that one of Rome’s most controversial new churches – Richard Meier’s Jubilee Church, which resembles a yacht with spinnakers hoisted – had won over locals, but complained that “the building materials were the focus of pre-construction meetings, not the liturgical life”.

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