Daubenmire: Send Money to Me, Not Red Cross

“Coach” Dave Daubenmire has a video telling his followers that they should not send money to the Red Cross after a natural disaster because they’re a “government-approved charity.” No, you should send the money to him instead because he’ll “share the gospel” while handing out help because after a natural disaster people are “stressed out” and “very open to the gospel.”

httpv://youtu.be/psWrwT3FAFE

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • hunter

    That’s it — kick ’em while they’re down.

  • http://www.rodlamkey.net reverendrodney

    A little Shock Doctrine, eh coach?

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    What a ripoff. Give the money to me, and I’ll sit at home and pray real hard for them. Donate twenty bucks and I’ll go out to the corner and directly attack people with the bible. Donate fifty dollars or more and I’ll go across the street to the Starbucks and throw dashboard Jesuses at their customers. Act now and I’ll invite the Westboro Baptist church to protest at your funeral.

  • dingojack

    But, but, but you Librulz don’t unerstand! Winning isn’t Everything, its the ONLY THING!!!!

    @@

    Dingo

  • kemist, Dark Lord of the Sith

    That’s I think no religious organisation should be granted charity status unless they submit to a surprise inspection to see if they use charity as a means to spread their religion on captive and vulnerable audiences.

    The poor and desperate have a right to dignity and should get to have a voice in deciding what kind of help they want. If they do not want the Jesus crap, it shouldn’t be shoved down their troaths.

  • unbound

    In addition to almost certainly keeping the lion’s share of the money donated to the “coach”, I do enjoy the heavy-handed comment moderation of the video. 4 comments allowed so far (1 from the “coach” himself)…all in support of him, of course.

  • cottonnero

    What a vulture.

  • Mr Ed

    My gospel is so good, so true and so compelling that the best time to share it is when people are vulnerable. Very telling

  • andrewjohnston

    For the record, “Pass the Salt Ministries” is actually registered as a 501(c)(3) organization, so I hope Coach Dave is keeping his politics out of this. Trying to dig up some transparency documents, for the moment this is the best I’ve found.

  • Draken

    If I’d been hit by a disaster and lost my house/dog/family, and you came over trying to evangelise, it would be a good time to remember if you’ve ever picked up your teeth with broken fingers.

  • andrewjohnston

    Well, I checked around and there’s basically nothing about the “Coach’s” organization. There’s nothing to indicate that the group is fraudulent (as some of the commenters have done without evidence), but there’s not much else, either. This suggests that we’re dealing with a tiny group, probably based out of a single church, which obviously is not going to have the assets or manpower necessary to deal with a disaster of this magnitude.

    The one bit I could find suggests that the group is seriously overspent. Serious Givers lists a reserve ratio (assets/liabilities) of 0.16 for Pass the Salt Ministries. While it’s not uncommon for a charity to have liabilities outnumber assets, a 6-to-1 ratio suggests an organization so strapped that it’s on the verge of collapse. Might explain the fundraising push.

  • otrame

    Well, he’s right about one thing. I wouldn’t send money to the Red Cross, because it is a bloated semi-charity (they have been known to SELL water and snacks to first responders) and has been for nearly a hundred years. The fact that it is the “default” charity has encouraged this problem. It’s easy to send money to them, because otherwise you have to do a little research. That’s why I appreciate Foundation Beyond Belief. They’ll be there, making sure your money doesn’t come with a dose of Jesus and is actually used for helping something other than the salaries of professional Red Cross people.

  • raven

    No, you should send the money to him instead because he’ll “share the gospel” while handing out help because after a natural disaster people are “stressed out” and “very open to the gospel.”

    Sending missionaries to Oklahoma seems pointless.

    The state is already about as god soaked as you can get.

    This is cuckoo.

    A few people, almost certainly xians, are sitting around the wreckage of their house trying to salvage a few belongings. Some wacko walks up and says, don’t worry. I have the solution. “I’ll pray for you and BTW, have a bible.” He leaves. And a few people are still sitting around the wreckage of their house.

    At this point, they need tangibles like food, shelter, medical care, and money.

  • raven

    What a vulture.

    More like a parasite.

    Daubenmire has been fired from a few jobs.

    I’m not sure what he is doing for money these days, but I’d be rather cautious about sending anything to his charity.

  • zippythepinhead

    I DO want your money, because GOD wants your money.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087995/quotes?item=qt0280557

  • dan4

    The horror that the Red Cross is “government-approved” (•rolls eyes*).

  • chisaihana5219

    There is a real problem sending money to the Red Cross after a tragedy. Most people assume that if the Red Cross asks for money to help the folks in Oklahoma, and you send some, that your money actually goes to the folks in Oklahome. It doesn’t. It goes into the general fund at the Red Cross. Then they decide how much to give to the needy folks and how to give it. If you want to directly help victims of a local disaster, you need to find a local charity that helps locally. When the Fukushima disaster happened in Japan, the International Red Cross was soliciting donations. Instead of them, I gave money to the Japanese Red Cross (through their embassy). At least then I knew that my money would go to people in Japan, not in some other country.

  • Peter B

    If you don’t want Christian messages being given as Oklahoma disaster relief how about Scientology? It’s likely that their Volunteer Ministers could use a little help. Xenu knows auditing is needed after a disaster.

  • http://thebronzeblog.wordpress.com/ Bronze Dog

    Sending missionaries to Oklahoma seems pointless.

    The state is already about as god soaked as you can get.

    I don’t think it’s about actually converting anyone. It’s about getting attention and by extension, money.

  • Karen Locke

    I, too, do my giving through Foundation Beyond Belief or their suggested emergency charities. If FBB has vetted it, it trust it.

    But I also agree with Draken (#10), if someone tried to evangelize me after a great loss they’d get a piece of my mind so big I’d have to patch the hole in my head. As the coach says, I’d be vulnerable then — but not to his gospel, but to holding my tongue and being civil.

  • Who Knows?

    There is a real problem sending money to the Red Cross after a tragedy.

    Never really understood people who want to put conditions on gifts, really seems like an over-controlling move to me.

    When you give to the Red Cross and the money goes into the general fund, that actually enables the Red Cross to fund operations anywhere, including your new favorite disaster. You know the Red Cross has operations in Oklahoma helping the victims of the disaster. So your donations are either directly or indirectly contributing to the cause.

    In general, the Red Cross does a pretty good job managing its donations and I would trust them over most local charities. This “Coach” Dave Daubenmire for example, whose argument you’re making.

  • jthompson

    @Who Knows?: For a start because it’s dishonest. When a group raises funds for a disaster, people that donate kind of expect it to be used for that disaster.

    It doesn’t bother me personally, because I tend to give to charities whether there’s a disaster happening or not, but I can understand why it would irk some people.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    raven @ # 13: … Oklahoma … is already about as god soaked as you can get.

    I would’ve thought so too, before the May tornadoes – but if even Wolf Blitzer can find an overt atheist in the rubble, they’re probably swarming all over the place.

  • Who Knows?

    I don’t really see any dishonesty in it.

    I don’t see how the Red Cross could operate if they didn’t have control over how donations are spent. They would be having to cut funding for operations that weren’t the “disaster of the week” all the time.

  • Trebuchet

    @ 1

    7: Agreed. The Red Cross was a bit of a scandal after 9/11, collecting millions and sending pretty much none of it to NYC, where it wasn’t badly needed because of massive government aid.

    @9, andrewjohnston:

    For the record, “Pass the Salt Ministries” is actually registered as a 501(c)(3) organization, so I hope Coach Dave is keeping his politics out of this.

    Don’t count on it. There’s actually a good reason the IRS was investigating all of those TeaParty groups.

  • Tyrant al-Kalām

    Haha, classy!

    The Red Cross was a bit of a scandal after 9/11, collecting millions and sending pretty much none of it to NYC, where it wasn’t badly needed because of massive government aid.

    Donations which come with a precise dedication to a particular purpose are always annoying for the receiving organization, and not very useful, or so I’ve heard.

  • scienceavenger

    His message might be more convincing if he didn’t have a red cross on his head.

  • baal

    Oh to be delusional or lack a conscience or both. It seems you can get a lot of free cash if you’re willing to give those up (and can stomach being overtly religious).

  • marym

    Daubenmire is a well-known character is my neck of the woods. He is a one-man ministry – no church – whose goal is to become a nationally known Christian leader. The man just loves to run his mouth. Jesus and God are merely supporting players in the Dave Daubenmire Show. Occasionally Daubenmire will cease lecturing for a while and actually do some Christian charity work. Recently he helped get a semi-truck full of donated bread products to the OK tornado victims. Donations allowed Daubenmire and SIX other men to transport ONE semi to OK. The donations paid for gas, lodging and food for SEVEN men on this trip. Daubenmire had himself filmed “reporting” on the tornado and interviewing victims just like those “real” reporters on FOX-TV. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYul9BYs9Kg

    The trickle of money that comes into his ministry allows him to play “reporter”, “preacher”, “pundit”, “annointed” leader of men, and other fantasy roles. His wife’s job supports the family and pays the bills.

    Every Bible thumper like Daubenmire has a dirty little secret. Daubenmire’s is that the son he raised to be a manly Christian man is a registered sex offender. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1791954/posts