King: Christianity Will ‘Restore’ America

The Worldnutdaily decided to do an interview with Rep. Steve King “that focused on faith, not politics.” The results are rather predictable, with the standard rhetoric about America being based on a “Judeo-Christian foundation” and similar nonsense.

“I think if you are going to reverse engineer America, go back through history … you could not build America without Christianity,” he told WND reporter Taylor Rose is an interview that focused on faith, not politics.

“Whether it shows up on our sleeve or in our heart, it’s what will restore our nation,” he said.

The congressman explained that the rule of law on which free societies function today is traceable to the Ten Commandments, given to Moses by God.

“The rule of law was established in Scripture, under Moses,” he explained.

Both Roman and Greek civilizations adopted the concept, and they spread it through the world.

One has to wonder what kind of history class King took in high school. The Greeks adopted the Mosaic law and spread it throughout the world? When did that supposedly happen? Which ancient Greek thinkers pointed to the Mosaic law as the source of their ideas? And no, Moses did not establish the rule of law. Other civilizations before and after had their own legal ideas. Has King ever heard of Ur-Nammu or Hammurabi? Does he think the Chinese, Egyptians and Sumerians had no set of laws to govern with? This is what happens when the only book you read is the Bible, you’re utterly ignorant of the rest of the world.

He said he was debating liberal Alan Colmes one time on radio over the issue of whether the U.S. is Christian. King argued that it is and told Colmes he would prove.

Citing a scenario of a man accidentally running over a neighbor’s dog, he listed the expected actions: an explanation that it was not intentional; an apology and expression of sorrow; and a response of forgiveness.

Those actions express the biblical principles of confession, repentance, forgiveness and redemption, he said.

“This is a Christian society.”

Uh, yeah. Because non-Christian people would never have thought of saying they’re sorry. Seriously, who could possibly find this argument anything but laughable?

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  • Alverant

    I don’t remember anything in the christian bible about voting for your leaders or freedom of expression either.

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    Ob. quote from the Treaty of Tripoli, proposed by President George Washington, signed in Tripoli on November 4, 1796, ratified on June 7, 1797 by a Senate comprising mostly of the men who wrote the Constitution, and signed by President John Adams on June 10, 1797.

    Art. 11. As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion,—as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion, or tranquility, of Mussulmen,—and as the said States never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

    If this country had been founded as a Christian nation, certainly SOMEONE would have noticed this text and changed it.

  • unbound

    @Gregory in Seattle – I think it is even easier than the Treaty of Tripoli. If this was a christian nation, there is absolutely zero chance that God wouldn’t be mentioned all over the Constitution.

  • dingojack

    I wonder if King has every even heard tell of Shakespeare:

    It is as sure as you are Roderigo,

    Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago:

    In following him, I follow but myself;

    Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty,

    But seeming so, for my peculiar end:

    For when my outward action doth demonstrate

    The native act and figure of my heart

    In compliment extern, ’tis not long after

    But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve

    For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.”

    – Othello.

    [Emphasis mine]

    Dingo

  • dingojack

    Unboun – or better still:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances,” [Empasis mine].

    And how does that square with the first commandment again?

    :) Dingo

  • Francisco Bacopa

    Why does Steve King hate European, African, and Native American culture so much? As a person of European and Native American ancestry I am deeply offended. How can he say my ancestors were lawless barbarians until we got exposed to the alleged law of his magic Sky Man?

    Actually, I’m not that offended as I have become quite used to it.

  • Jeremy Shaffer

    Seriously, who could possibly find this argument anything but laughable?

    The average WorldNet daily reader, I’d imagine. You can almost hear them filing that one under “Checkmate, Atheist!”

  • Moggie

    When anyone claims that the ten commandments are the basis of the rule of law, I think they should be asked two questions:

    1. Can you list them? I suspect that many people who claim that the ten commandments are so vital would struggle to remember them all. Obviously, this only works in an offline environment.

    2. What do you believe should be the legal penalty for violating each commandment? For example: if I make a carved image, should I be punished by stoning, or would a fine suffice? What’s the appropriate length of jail sentence for being a Hindu?

  • http://www.facebook.com/den.wilson d.c.wilson

    This is what happens when the only book you read is the Bible,

    If King is like most Funjelical types, it’s doubtful that he’s even read that book.

  • dingojack

    Moggie – Carved or engraved images are a no-no. Photographic, molded, extruded, 3_D printed, holographic, sculptured (as long as the material is in a plastic form) etc. is all perfectly OK, naturally.

    Dingo

  • Pierce R. Butler

    … when the only book you read is the Bible, you’re utterly ignorant of the rest of theal world.

    Ftfy.

  • http://www.etsy.com/shop/LDORIGINALS Dalillama, Schmott Guy

    What’s the appropriate length of jail sentence for being a Hindu?

    Until you stop and become a christian, obviously, you silly person.

  • greg1466

    In his defense, you probably couldn’t recreate American history without Christianity. I mean without Christianity, we probably would have gotten rid of slavery, segregation, the disenfranchisement of women, discrimination of any minority you care to mention and many other immoral social stances much sooner.

  • eric

    What I like about these claims is that evidently, Christianity is a scale-dependent force. If you adopt it personally, your fortunes don’t change and miracles don’t happen. If a nuclear family adopts it, their fortunes don’t change and miracles don’t happen. If a county adopts it, their fortunes don’t change and miracles don’t happen. If a State were to adopt it, their fortunes wouldn’t change and miracles wouldn’t happen. But if the federal government adopts it…bang! Everyone will have a Mercedes Benz and satellite TV. Crime will disappear, the streets will be lined with gold, and everyone will vote Republican.

    Maybe they should change their motto. “Chrisitianity will Restore The Nation: because if you add three hundred million 0’s together, you get 1.”

  • http://timgueguen.blogspot.com timgueguen

    Someone should send King a book on Japanese culture. They’re big on repentance and atonement. He’d really like the Yakuza, who will cut off a joint of a finger to repent for a really bad lapse of behaviour.

  • scienceavenger

    Unbound – I think it is even easier than the Treaty of Tripoli. If this was a christian nation, there is absolutely zero chance that God wouldn’t be mentioned all over the Constitution.

    Indeed, I like to contrast the constitution to the Mayflower Compact:

    “In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, defender of the Faith, etc.

    Having undertaken, for the Glory of God, and advancements of the Christian faith and honor of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God…”

    Now that’s what a Christian document looks like!

  • iangould

    I think Congressman King is 100% correct.

    He, and all politicians who agree with him, should quit their jobs to devote themselves 24/7 to prayer.

  • skinnercitycyclist

    Re: Moses and God being the first to invent law:

    In his own schooldays, Winston remembered, in the late fifties, it was only the helicopter that the Party claimed to have invented; a dozen years later, when Julia was at school, it was already claiming the aeroplane; one generation more, and it would be claiming the steam engine.

    What’s next? Rock and roll? comfortable shoes?