GOP Won’t Even Pass Policy It Supports

Since Obama took office, the Republican party, especially in the House, has repeatedly refused to vote for policies that they themselves support. Here’s another example. Now they’re refusing to fix a minor glitch in the health care reform bill that they would otherwise strongly support because they’re so intent on killing the entire law (which they cannot do).

Sahil Kapur has an insightful report showing just how this plan of action is working in practice. One of the glitches to emerge in Obamacare is that it does not deem many church health-insurance plans to be fully qualified under the law. As written, it would make them disband their insurance plans and put their employees on to the exchanges. Churches are urging a reform to fix this flaw, and Senators Mark Pryor and Chris Coons are sponsoring a bill to do just that.

But they can’t get a Republican sponsor and have no realistic hope of attracting any Republican support in the near future. “We’re not expecting it to get a vote — at least not anytime soon,” Coons’s spokesman tells Kapur.

The reason is that Republicans are following a strategy of withholding support for any bipartisan fixes to the law. They will vote to repeal or undermine Obamacare, but they won’t support any changes intended to improve its functioning. It’s a pure Leninist strategy — heighten the contradictions to help hasten the collapse they are certain is inevitable.

The same strategy undergirds the Republican campaign to refuse Medicaid. This is a pure case of pain-infliction by Republican-controlled states. They are turning down the federal government’s offer to pay 90 percent of the costs of Medicaid expansion, and thus leaving their poorest residents uninsured, as a sadistic display of resistance to the dread Obamacare…

Where this policy is likely to hurt Republicans, though, is with organized interests. Uninsured people who could be getting federally financed health insurance will still be showing up in emergency rooms and getting access to care, which hospitals will be on the hook for. Now we can add churches, who will be seeing their health plans taken away. If they go to Republican elected officials seeking a solution, they’ll be told they won’t get any because Republicans are holding out to repeal Obamacare. There’s only one party that will be endorsing practical solutions. Republicans will be completely locked out by their insanely spiteful refusal to work within the contours of the new health-care law.

The fact that this behavior has not hurt the GOP more than it has can’t be a healthy development. But if they actually do manage to force a government shutdown over Obamacare, it will boomerang on them in a big way.

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  • http://spaninquis.wordpress.com/ Spanish Inquisitor

    As the Democrat from Kentucky who is challenging McConnell (can’t remember her name) said “If Mitch McConnell’s doctor told him he had a kidney stone, he’d refuse to pass it’.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    “The fact that this behavior has not hurt the GOP more than it has can’t be a healthy development.”

    But Both Parties Do It!©*

     

    “But if they actually do manage to force a government shutdown over Obamacare, it will boomerang on them in a big way.”

    Sure, but breaking the world (and, in doing so, proving that Government Can’t Work) will all be worth it to prevent the people from having health insurance. The Republican Party believe in Free Market solutions to problems that the Free Market solves by ignoring. If the Undeserving Poor want health coverage, they should be Job Creators, connected, or in Congress.

     

    * “Both Parties Do It!” copyright So-Called Liberal Media, Inc. So-Called Liberal Media, Inc; Solving your false equivocation needs since 1980.

  • raven

    The fact that this behavior has not hurt the GOP more than it has can’t be a healthy development.

    True.

    Obama spent his entire two terms mostly fixing the Bush Catastrophe.

    1. Ending the pointless war in Iraq and winding down Afghanistan.

    2. Fixing the Bush Great Recession. With some success, considering how bad it was.

    He still didn’t do that well in the elections. Won by 9 million votes in the first election, 5 million in the second against a nonxian Reptilian-human hybrid.

    Oh well. Nations commit suicide often. We saw that with the old USSR. Toynbee found that 19 of 22 civilizations fell from within. Someday we are going to make it 20 out of 23. I just hope it holds together for my projected lifespan.

  • markr1957

    Is more evidence that Republicans don’t represent their electorates even necessary? It is as clear as mud that they only represent their corporate paymasters and that they don’t (and can’t) represent the people of their districts any longer, even if they want to.

  • http://www.themindisaterriblething.com shripathikamath

    Is more evidence that Republicans don’t represent their electorates even necessary?

    No, they are elected because they represent their electorate perfectly. They hate Obama; anything to deny Obama any semblance of a win is what they want, and they are doing it well.

    To accommodate these wingnuts, the country is moving right with “well, they have a point, no, not the extreme ones, but we need better balance” BS.

  • D. C. Sessions

    Toynbee found that 19 of 22 civilizations fell from within. Someday we are going to make it 20 out of 23. I just hope it holds together for my projected lifespan.

    Define “fall.” IIRC Toynbee’s examples were primarily dynastic collapses (either to a successor dynasty or to a republic), which is not terribly surprising. Would the replacement of the Articles of Confederation by the current Constitution count?

    If the US Government were replaced by another with strong provisions for individual rights and fewer anachronisms left over from the 18th century compromises (3/5 and all the other slavery baggage, including the power of the states) I would be delighted. The Founders didn’t expect the Constitution to last much past their lifetimes, and the age is showing. Of course, I doubt we’d get my wish list any time soon, but as long as the transition is fairly peaceful and doesn’t regress horribly I won’t be too upset.

  • Nick Gotts

    Toynbee found that 19 of 22 civilizations fell from within. Someday we are going to make it 20 out of 23. – raven

    *le sigh*

    I do wish you’d stop confusing individual sovereign states (“nations”), such as the USA, with civilizations. Toynbee doesn’t: the Introduction to his Study of History is entitled The Unit of Historical Study, and explicitly warns against this error.

  • http://thebronzeblog.wordpress.com/ Bronze Dog

    But Both Parties Do It!©*

    I’m told there’s a Fark meme: “Both parties are bad, so vote Republican?”

  • exdrone

    If the Republicans vote to repeal Obamacare 100 times, then they can level up, which they believe will give them more potions and spells.

  • raven

    Define “fall.”

    You should ask Toynbee.

    I gave an example. What happened to the USSR. Civilizations don’t fall all the way back to the stone age. Yet, anyway. Even the Greeks are still around, sort of, albeit right now broke. But it isn’t fun to go through a collapse.

    I do wish you’d stop confusing individual sovereign states (“nations”), such as the USA, with civilizations.

    It’s a colloquil term. If it makes you feel better, it reads better as our American civilization. I suppose now someone will point out that calling the USA civilized might be stretching a point.

  • Nick Gotts

    It’s a colloquil term. If it makes you feel better, it reads better as our American civilization. – raven

    But Toynbee, who you are so fond of citing in this context, would say that the USA is a proper part of what he calls “western civilization”. If you’re going to cite the guy, don’t misrepresent what he says.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    raven “It’s a colloquil term.”

    Isn’t colloquil what you take when your digestive tract has a cold?*

     

    * Colloquil, the cut the cheese, farting, tooting, ripping, windy, smelly-butt, vapors, so

    you can poop medicine.

  • lpetrich

    As to Greece, it entered history over 3000 years ago as independent city-states. It stayed that was until Philip of Macedon’s conquests around 300 BCE. A few centuries later, the Romans took over, and the area was part of the Roman Empire for a millennium and a half. Yes, the Byzantines considered themselves Romans even after losing Rome and being headquartered in Byzantium / Constantinople / Istanbul. A little over 500 years ago, it was conquered by the Turks, and Greece became Ottoman territory. Greece became independent again by the middle to late 19th cy., and it has been an independent nation ever since.

  • netamigo

    Many of the church health insurance plans I have seen fail most solvency tests for insurance. That is probably the main reason they fail to qualify under the Federal rules.

  • eric

    It makes an odd sort of sense. If some legislator proposed to amend “a bill for the killing of children in gladiatorial sports, and unfair taxation of Starbucks,” by making the taxation of Starbucks fair, I doubt I’d vote for that amendment. I doubt I’d vote for it even if the law was already in effect and I perceived there was a 0% chance of a full repeal. If you think the main point of the bill is fundamentally that badly wrong for society, then you likely don’t want to participate in even symbolic or tacit acknowledgements of it’s legitimacy.

    The problem comes from the disanalogy: Obama care simply isn’t killing kids in gladiatorial arenas. Its a requirement that states provide a private-sector health care option to people who don’t have health care through their employer (or medicare). Because its simply not that extreme, blocking good amendments simply comes across as obstructionist, rather than some noble stand on principle.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    eric “Obama care simply isn’t killing kids in gladiatorial arenas.”

    Isn’t it? ISN’T IT?!!!