Some Serious Psychological Projection

Matt Barber’s latest column is little more than an advertisement for another wingnutapalooza scheduled for Florida. The conference is called For Such a Time as This, a reference to the Biblical story of Esther, and it’s aimed at Christian right women. This passage jumped out at me:

WIN founder Sue Trombino has underscored why your faith and action are needed now more than ever: “Our nation is in imminent danger of self-destruction at the hands of its own under-educated, misinformed, disconnected citizens,” she’s warned.

“Our enemies around the globe are diligently working to exploit our ignorance and tolerance to bring the United States of America to its knees. It is time for God’s people to take a stand and do something. But to be effective, we must first understand what it is we believe, why we believe it, and what we can do about protecting our faith and our rights.”

Indeed, as goes the old adage: “Knowledge is power.”

Yes, a Christian right leader just talked about other people being under-educated and misinformed. That is some weeapons-grade projection right there.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • unbound

    Good thing she didn’t mention self-awareness or that projection would be full on nuclear.

  • Synfandel

    Or in her case, probably “nucular”.

  • John Pieret

    Our enemies around the globe are diligently working to exploit our ignorance and tolerance to bring the United States of America to its knees.

    Yeah, because if there is one thing that is going to bring us to our knees, it’s tolerance.

    (Ignore the irony of the phrase, given how often they call on Americans to get down on their knees.)

  • dugglebogey

    “Our nation is in imminent danger of self-destruction at the hands of its own under-educated, misinformed, disconnected citizens,” she’s warned.

    Actually, the educated, informed and connected people are the ones your movement has the most to fear.

    The under-educated, misinformed and disconnected are the ones you prey on.

    Is it a coincidence that the word prey and pray sound the same?

  • vmanis1

    When these folk use the word `education’, they are not using it according to the standard definition. Replacing it by `indoctrination’ gets us closer to their understanding.

    (Insert obligatory Inigo Montoya reference here.)

  • matty1

    I almost wonder if this is some kind of code for other members of the Sinister Right Wing Conspiracy (c) R Cheney 2000

    “Knowledge is Power” fits very well with the view that conservative elites are using religion to control the rubes. They know perfectly well it isn’t true but want to keep others ignorant in order to cement their power. I say almost because I think it is a bit too close to illuminati territory to be credible but it’s almost more comforting than thinking people with influence actually believe this shit.

  • Nihilismus

    But to be effective, we must first understand what it is we believe, why we believe it, and what we can do about protecting our faith and our rights.”

    Wait . . . if you don’t know what you believe and/or why you believe it, can you really be said to have “faith”? Why would you need to protect beliefs you don’t know you have?

  • jaytheostrich

    Just what does their faith have to do with America, which is a secular country, in fact the very first one?

  • Pierce R. Butler

    Reminder: the Esther story is one of the least historically valid in the whole Babble, being nothing more than a Judaized re-telling of the Babylonian myth of Ishtar & Marduk.

    The reason this yarn has become famous as the only “book” in any testament not to mention God is that in the original version, all the main characters were gods.

  • vmanis1

    I don’t care what anybody says about the Book of Esther…hamantaschen are truly delicious.

  • Michael Heath

    matty1 writes:

    They know perfectly well [religious beliefs] isn’t true but want to keep others ignorant in order to cement their power.

    I’ve yet to see one cite that validates this is true. Certainly some social dominators within conservative Christianity cynically exploit their base, but that few seems relatively few (e.g., Rush Limbaugh) while their full set of leaders appears to me to be increasingly reflective of what the base believes, e.g., Mitt Romney, George W. Bush, David Barton, Bill O’Reilly, Rick Santorum, Rick Perry, Ted Cruz to name a few.

    When it comes to emerging leaders, I see far more following the Sarah Palin template than the Ronald Reagan approach, especially at the local and state level, which is where the federal leaders are groomed.

  • Chiroptera

    “Our nation is in imminent danger of self-destruction at the hands of its own under-educated, misinformed, disconnected citizens,” she’s warned.

    Huh. I thought it was the pointed-headed elitist educated, informed, and connected citizens that was supposed to be the boogey man. Man, the right wing can’t even keep its talking points straight!

  • greg1466

    To be fair, she doesn’t actually specify who the “under-educated, misinformed, disconnected citizens” are. Maybe she’s talking about “God’s people” and is planning a mass lemming-like movement…

  • eric

    It is time for God’s people to take a stand and do something. But to be effective, we must first understand what it is we believe, why we believe it, and what we can do about protecting our faith and our rights.”

    The religious message lets it his the crazy mark, but its this completely opaque and meaningless drivel that really sends it over the top.

    After viewing a lot of protest signs around D.C., I find that it is relatively easy to identify the dedicated from the extremists from the cranks. The dedicated carry signs that have sensible arguments and slogans for their position. Their communication is focused ‘outward,’ towards viewers that may not be part of their group. The extremists carry signs that argue for their position, but not in any sensible way that an outsider can pick up on. Their communication is focused on their own group, but it still makes sense to others in that group. The cranks carry signs that probably make sense to them, but which are simply gobbledigook to most everyone else. In many cases, its not even clear what issue they’re talking about or what position they take on it. Their speech has gone on so long without being checked against other people for its communication value, that it’s devolved into an individual language.

    The announcement above toes the line pretty close to the third category.

  • mjmiller

    Wait . . . if you don’t know what you believe and/or why you believe it, can you really be said to have “faith”? Why would you need to protect beliefs you don’t know you have?

    Nihilismus,

    In my experience it’s precisely because they don’t know what they believe or why they believe it that their faith is so necessary, and why they so desperately need to protect the beliefs they can’t explain.

  • freehand

    Nihilismus: Wait . . . if you don’t know what you believe and/or why you believe it, can you really be said to have “faith”? Why would you need to protect beliefs you don’t know you have?

    .

    Faith is the set of beliefs which are needed to be a member of the Tribe in good standing. Not everyone knows all the beliefs,(1) any more than a college student knows all the knowledge in her field. They bear repeating now and again, just so everyone’s on the same page. Now I wouldn’t use this word that way, but I left the Tribe fifty years ago, in the dead of the night. Those people are crazy.

    .

    (1) Especially because they are largely arbitrary. Does a True Believer love or hate NSA surveillance of US citizens? Does a True Believer approve of his daughter studying martial arts (“Because we’re tough”) or disapprove (“Because it’s not lady-like”)? They have to be told, by Rush Limbaugh, Pat Robertson, or some other moral authority [sic]. Then they will have always had that position.

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    When these folk use the word `education’, they are not using it according to the standard definition. Replacing it by `indoctrination’ gets us closer to their understanding.

    I was going to say something similar. Let me add to this that fundies give themselves a great deal of cognitive dissonance by believing that their religion is obviously and unquestioningly true. And yet it turns out that lots of people still don’t believe it. Their way of assuaging their dissonance is to assume not that their religion might be less than 100% persuasive, but that the unbelievers must be ignorant or stupid. (And when that obviously won’t wash, the heathens are “rebelling against God”.) This is also how they rationalize their constant god-bothering.

    So I’m pretty sure that she means what she says, though of course those words mean very different things to the rest of us.