Testing in Accelerated Christian ‘Education’

Nashville-based Accelerated Christian Education supplies textbooks and curricular materials to thousands of Christian schools and probably hundreds of thousands of homeschooling parents. Jonny Scaramonga at Leaving Fundamentalist got a box full of their material and details some of the multiple-choice questions on their tests that will just leave you shaking your head.

ACE answers

Go see the rest of them. This is what they consider “education.”

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  • http://howlandbolton.com richardelguru

    I don’t know about the ‘god gave’ bit, but in answer to that last one I often use cookies to discover more about our wonderful users world.

  • http://howlandbolton.com richardelguru

    And I’m special

  • matty1

    Come on, two dry ducks is the best answer ever

  • dingojack
  • Loqi

    Poor kids.

  • dingojack

    What, no question on the meaning of ‘santorum’? Colour me shocked!

    DIngo

  • joe_k

    Amusingly, the majority of the questions could be more correctly answered with “None of the above.”… Although later on fewer of the questions are absolutely wrong, merely stupid.

  • freethinkercro

    And this is from Accelerated Christian Education. You don’t want to see how dumbed-down the questions in Basic Christian Education are.

  • Loqi

    Doing the literal word substitutions has amused me to no end. The pastor spoke with great tasty milk. Presumably the conversation between the pastor and the great tasty milk went well, since the pastor is used to holding conversations with imaginary voices.

  • Richard Smith

    Loqi (#9):

    The pastor spoke with great tasty milk.

    And with the cookies God gave him.

  • magistramarla

    I taught at a public high school in Texas. Many of our ninth graders came to us from xtian schools.

    They were totally unprepared to answer questions on tests that required any critical thinking. I tried to ease my students into it, but parents complained that I was giving their precious snowflakes tests that were too difficult. (I had one student who claimed that she signed up for Latin so that she could read the bible “in its original language”)

    I was called into the AP’s office and she “strongly suggested” that I only give tests with multiple choice or short answer questions. She also “suggested” that there should never be any surprise questions, meaning that I should always go over each test question with the class the day before. She claimed that this was the best way to serve our diverse population of students.

    College professors and the general public blamed the teachers when we sent them students who could barely write and could not think critically. We teachers tried, but our efforts were often shot down by administrators who were pandering to parents who fervently believed in this type of xtian education.

    This was part of why I left the teaching profession.

  • Doug Little

    I was called into the AP’s office and she “strongly suggested” that I only give tests with multiple choice or short answer questions. She also “suggested” that there should never be any surprise questions, meaning that I should always go over each test question with the class the day before. She claimed that this was the best way to serve our diverse population of students.

    So did she back that up with evidence like a teaching professional should? Also how did you sit there and not laugh in their face? What a fucking joke, I’m glad I was educated in Australia, it seems awfully hit and miss over here.

  • Michael Heath

    I remain frustrated more of us won’t describe this for what it is, child abuse.

  • Doug Little

    You don’t want to see how dumbed-down the questions in Basic Christian Education

    What about Remedial Christian Education?

  • Chris from Europe

    Why are there even answers to select? Shouldn’t children in 4th grade be able to formulate answers in full sentences?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=730511544 billdaniels

    `I had a fundamentalist neighbor who home-schooled her three daughters. I was at their house when she was doing a 3rd grade math problem with her eldest. It was basic arithmetic. The daughter gave an answer and the mother checked the answer key. Then she said, “Your answer is right but I have no idea why.” This was third fucking grade math! The daughter once told my seven-year-old son that she didn’t believe in evolution. My son said, “You’re kidding, right?” When we got home I had to explain fundamentalism to him. He was amazed.

  • vmanis1

    I thank God for giving me the cookies to read this thread without laughing or crying myself to death.

  • markr1957

    We have home-schooling fundamentalist neighbors who graduated their oldest son last year. The last time we heard from the young man he had qualified to attend an online Christian Junior College. I hate to imagine how shocked he will be when he finally has to meet reality and work in the real world. I find it more and more difficult to hide my amazement that there are grown ups in this country who are not embarrassed to admit that they still believe fairy stories!

  • iknklast

    Scale drawing has nothing that resembles a correct answer. It doesn’t mean small picture; it means a picture with the same proportions as the item it represents, even though it’s smaller

  • lofgren

    Or larger.

  • freehand

    Michael Heath: I remain frustrated more of us won’t describe this for what it is, child abuse.

    The main reason I don’t say this more often is the logistics. If we claim that we should rescue one third or so of the children in this country (is that what you are implying?), we will have a hard time of it. We will not get sufficient support, and will face fierce and often violent resistance. Also, not all fundamentalists are abusing, at least not to this degree. I was raised biblical literalist, but was allowed and encourage to read history and science(1), and sent to public schools. And if home schooled kids are abused and we’re not trying to rescue them, what reason do we give for taking kids being whipped with coat hangers?

    Perhaps we need to raise public awareness on the appalling education many home schoolers get (I believe between one third and three fourths of home schoolers are religious fundamentalists). At the very least, test quarterly and properly, and if the kids don’t make the grade send ’em to public school. My generation (Boomer) was bad enough, with their fundamentalist ignorance electing Bush and producing the Tea Party. But home schooling hadn’t really caught on in the 1950s and 60s. We are now seeing a generation of young adults who cannot answer questions requiring third grade level reasoning and reading comprehension, and whose history and science misinformation is profound. I merely had to change my thinking to leave the church. These poor kids, if they deconvert, have to retroactively acquire 12 years of public schooling when they’re adults (and poor and lacking social support).

    (1) I think they assumed the science would back up the bible…

  • lofgren

    While failing to teach kids basic reasoning and facts is certainly heinous, “child abuse” has a perfectly useful definition that does not include teaching children ridiculous things. Calling this child abuse does nothing but divert the discussion to one of semantics, rather than one of substance. We can talk about the harm that is being done by this kind of education or we can call it child abuse and talk about what the definition of child abuse ought to be. The former seems far more productive.

  • Michael Heath

    lofgren writes:

    While failing to teach kids basic reasoning and facts is certainly heinous, “child abuse” has a perfectly useful definition that does not include teaching children ridiculous things.

    Strawman of the month.

    My reference was in regards to the indoctrination of children coupled to the societal pressures children of fundies exist within that limits their educative and career opportunities. I’m comfortable what fundies do to kids meets the definition of abuse, a particularly insidious form. Including those children who attend public schools where fundies influence the curriculum. That’s due to the results of such abuse.

    I know because I experienced both types first hand, as have tens of millions of other children. Altemeyer does an adequate job explaining how a few of us escape.

  • Michael Heath

    freehand writes:

    The main reason I don’t say this more often is the logistics. If we claim that we should rescue one third or so of the children in this country (is that what you are implying?), we will have a hard time of it. We will not get sufficient support, and will face fierce and often violent resistance. Also, not all fundamentalists are abusing, at least not to this degree.

    Your effective argument is that because so many are abused, it wouldn’t be politically prudent to tell the truth. I don’t find dishonesty a compelling argument.

    In addition you then argue fundies are not all abusive to this degree. That remains to be seen. My pointing out this abuse is focused on the heavily compromised educative, career, and marriage opportunities nearly all kids of fundies experience when they approach and reach adult-hood.

    So a kid with a great aptitude for science who ends up a dishwasher in a restaurant in his twenties, with no formal schooling beyond his GED largely due to his home-schooling fundie parents being fiercely anti-education, has in fact been abused. I know such a person.

    And that sort of abuse doesn’t mean the kid who attended public school where the Sarah Palin types are worshipped, where almost no kids end up going to college because college is where communists brainwash you, aren’t also abused. They are, I’m from this group and one of a mere fraction of those fortunate enough to rise up out of this abuse. We were never properly taught history or science; because actually teaching such topics adequately violated the beliefs of the people on our school board, whose president was also the paster of the fundie church I attended as a kid.

    A couple of years ago the NYTs ran a story that showed not even 50% of public school children are adequately taught evolution. Illustrative of the abuse I suffered in the 1970s remains an ongoing event at many red-state or rural public schools, not to mention the steep rise in both home-schooling and private fundie schools who falsely claim to teach K-12.

  • lofgren

    My reference was in regards to the indoctrination of children coupled to the societal pressures children of fundies exist within that limits their educative and career opportunities.

    That’s not a strawman, that’s a misunderstanding due to the vagueness of your pronouns.

    Nevertheless, this clearly isn’t child abuse by the definition used by 95% of the population. I agree, it meets the definition of “abuse” and these are children so technically it is “child abuse” in the same way that Julia is a girl who is my friend and therefore she is my “girlfriend.” Nevertheless, it’s not useful to go tossing the term around like that because it gets you farther from a discussion of the actual effects rather than allowing you to portray them more accurately. Just give it up.