Farah: Shut Down the EPA

From the Annals of Hyperbolic Overreactions: You’ve probably heard the story of John Beale, an EPA employee who apparently managed to fool them into paying his salary for years without actually doing anything. Joseph Farah has heard of it and he thinks the entire agency should be shut down over it.

Beale was sentenced recently to two-and-a-half years in prison for the monumental scam he perpetrated for so long.

But that’s not justice.

Justice would be if the EPA management that allowed this theft to go on lost their jobs and their far more wasteful and rogue agency were abolished…

Isn’t it time to abolish the EPA?

Oh, of course. One employee scammed the agency and therefore, logically, we should allow coal plants to spew as much pollution into the air as they want, allow chemical companies to dump dioxin and other dangerous toxic waste into our rivers and lakes and stop cleaning up Superfund sites around the nation. Because that’s a perfectly reasonable reaction to what happened.

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  • http://www.russellturpin.com/ rturpin

    Nah, the EPA is what keeps Texas civilized.

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    @rturpin #1 –

    Nah, the EPA is what keeps Texas civilized.

    And that pisses Texas off like nothing could.

  • matty1

    What are the odds Farah had already decided he didn’t like the agency before he heard this story? I suspect it has more to do with the fact his target audience object to any restrictions on how they use their property and run their businesses (even if they impact others) than that one man committed fraud.

  • hunter

    Justice would be if the CEOs of major financial institutions also got sent to jail for fraud.

    After a fair trial, of course.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    One employee scammed the agency and therefore, logically, we should allow coal plants to spew as much pollution into the air as they want, allow chemical companies to dump dioxin and other dangerous toxic waste into our rivers and lakes and stop cleaning up Superfund sites around the nation.

    No. They should be allowed to do that anyway. Because of this guy, though, they should be allowed to do it more. That smell of the river on fire is the smell of America! Freedom isn’t Freedom without those down river from your factory having burning rashes and flipper babies. Liberty can’t win unless someone else loses.

  • doublereed

    I assume he’s in favor of scrapping the TSA as well.

  • sundiver

    Since Jimmy Swaggart and that Jim Bakker got caught in sexual peccadilloes perhaps we should shut down all the fundie churches? All in favor say aye.

  • karmacat

    By his logic, he should shut himself down. He is getting a salary for not doing anything. And when he does anything, it is done incompetently

  • Gvlgeologist, FCD

    The weirdest part of this for me is that I’ve seen several essays and comments that are headlined something like, “Global warming chief has committed a hoax” and implies or explicitly states that this proves that global warming is a hoax.

    Because, you know, if one person in favor of an idea is lying about anything, that means that the idea is wrong as well, no matter what the evidence says. I think that the next time someone brings this up, I’ll mention all the frauds in religion and politics.

  • colnago80

    I’m sure that Farah will argue that dioxin, mercury emissions from coal burning power plants and waste products discharged into rivers and lakes are really good for you and that badmouthing them is a Communist plot.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    colnago80 “I’m sure that Farah will argue that dioxin, mercury emissions from coal burning power plants and waste products discharged into rivers and lakes are really good for you and that badmouthing them is a Communist plot.”

    And even if they’re bad for you, the Invisible Hand of the Free Market is far, far better at curtailing so-called “negative” externalities than Big Government. Once rivers are too much on fire, it kicks in and tones them down until the rivers are only comfortably on fire. Sure, there’s that “everybody downstream has cancer” thing, but that’s what way, way after-the-fact lawsuits are for.

  • Synfandel

    An army major went on a shooting spree in Fort Hood in Texas in 2009. They should shut down the entire US military.

  • Gvlgeologist, FCD

    hunter:

    Justice would be if the CEOs of major financial institutions also got sent to jail for fraud.

    And then by Farah’s logic, the “major financial institutions” should all be shut down as well.

  • blf

    An army major went on a shooting spree in Fort Hood in Texas in 2009. They should shut down the entire US military.

    And Texas.

    And ammo-makers.

    And gunsmiths / gun-makes.

    And the so-called “dairies” that make British Industrial Cheddar, an alleged “cheese”, whilst we are shutting-down the manufacturers of lethal instruments.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Gvlgeologist, FCD “And then by Farah’s logic, the ‘major financial institutions’” should all be shut down as well.”

    I don’t see why. All that happened because Carter (then Clinton) forced them to lend to “urban” (*wink wink*) people. Luckily, they managed to keep the massive, massive profits from a good decade of giving away bad loans, if only to pay a fraction of it for the “fines” for committing massive, massive “fraud”. Also, for undermining Dodd-Frank. And for bonuses.

  • magistramarla

    This makes me especially angry. I grew up in a VERY industrialized area. Our house was surrounded by oil refineries – Amoco, Shell and Sinclair (later Clark). There was also an ammunition manufacturing plant, a glassworks, a steel-working plant and Chemetco chemical company. I’m sure that there were even more that I can’t remember. I lived very close to the Mississippi river, and barges were readily available for transportation.

    I commuted nearly 30 miles to college the first year, and my boyfriend (later husband) said that he could smell and taste that community on my breath when I kissed him. One of my childhood friends was killed at the Shell refinery when he fell into a vat of acid. When I was there to clean out and sell my mother’s house, there was a warning to not drink the tap water because of a possible contamination. A glass of water smelled like a gas station. I didn’t try it, but there were reports that it was flammable. The childhood home of another classmate blew up when gas seeped into the basement from a broken underground pipeline belonging to one of the refineries. By luck, her elderly parents were at a doctor appointment that day.

    Cancer and other illnesses are rampant among the people who grew up there. I have a young third cousin who is lucky that she has lived to adulthood. She has battled leukemia since she was a pre-schooler. Many of my high school classmates are battling cancer or have already died. Autoimmune issues are also rampant in my family and friends, including myself. It can’t be proven that the pollution caused them, but I will always wonder about it.

    We need the EPA to protect us from the unfettered industrialization that I grew up living near. If anything, I feel that we need to strengthen the powers that agency has to protect future generations.

  • raven

    This makes me especially angry. I grew up in a VERY industrialized area.

    Well I didn’t.

    But I remember the good old days before the EPA.

    The air in LA was usually colored orange from smog. On a bad day, a car would have a film of oil and soot on it. The river near my house up north was so polluted, it was biologically dead and you couldn’t swim in it. Acid rain had wiped out whole lakes in the Northeast.

    All that has changed. The river has been cleaned up and supports fish and a salmon run. It’s popular for kayaks and canoes. People swim in it.

    The EPA has been a stunning achievement and polls show that a clean and livable environment is quite popular.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003657987619 Barefoot Bree

    But guys, you’re missing a key point here: this is how authoritarians think. If there’s a reasonable rule/law in place, and somebody breaks it, that means the rule/law must not have been harsh enough and must be tightened. I’ve seen it oh so many times: one person speeds horribly on a major suburban 45mph road, crashes into a car and kills somebody, and the speed limit on the road is lowered to a ridiculous 35. One newbie brings a tape deck into a “radios only” shop (to prevent inadvertent recording of classified conversations), and now everybody must take their radios home.

    It’s the “punish the entire group so they make the miscreant fall in line too” mentality writ large upon an entire population. But they can’t understand that it doesn’t work that way.