Another Wealthy Heir Gets Away With Molesting Stepdaughter

A few months ago it was revealed that an heir to the DuPont fortune had been convicted of raping his toddler daughter but was given a suspended sentence by the judge because he “will not fare well” in prison. And now we have a similar case, an heir to the Johnson and Johnson fortune getting only 4 months in jail (likely only two) for molesting his 12 year old stepdaughter.

The billionaire heir to the SC Johnson company’s fortune — who confessed to repeatedly sexually assaulting his teenage stepdaughter — received a four-month jail sentence on Friday from a Racine, WI judge who cited the Johnson family’s importance in the community.

Milwaukee’s Channel 4 News reported that Circuit Judge Eugene Gasiorkiewicz told 59-year-old defendant Samuel Curtis Johnson III that “you could not grow up in this community and not know some of the people involved in this case.”

According to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Johnson plead guilty to misdemeanor charges of fourth-degree sexual assault and disorderly conduct rather than the felony sexual assault on a minor child charges he originally faced in 2011.

The reality is that we don’t have a criminal justice system in this country, we have two of them — one for rich people and one for the rest of us. If you have money, you can get away with almost anything — except, of course, stealing from other rich people.

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  • Chris

    I don’t think “SC Johnson” is the same as “Johnson and Johnson.”

  • laurentweppe

    If you have money, you can get away with almost anything — except, of course, stealing from other rich people.

    Or more generally harming other rich people: if the stepdaughter decides once grown-up to avenge herself, I doubt that justice will be lenient to her “I spent twelve days torturing to death my rapist because you didn’t do your fucking job” defense.

  • Chiroptera

    So, an open admission that our penal system doesn’t meet the standards of a civilized society, and that sending someone into a US prison may be cruel and inhumane. Unfortunately there seems to be a silent “but it’s good enough for poor people and black people” in a hidden footnote.

  • Alverant

    So what happens if a rich guys says, “If I’m convicted and have to go to prison, I’ll have to shut down my company and put a lot of the people in this town out of work.” because that seems to be what happened here. The guy was in charge of a major employer so he was given a lighter sentence because he was “important to the community” or something like that.

    To be clear, I don’t approve of this appallingly short sentence. What I want to know is how do you handle the fallout when the powerful fall because it’s the people they land on who suffer the most.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    The reality is that we don’t have a criminal justice system in this country, we have two of them — one for rich people and one for the rest of us.

    Now you’re just being ridiculous. There are eleven (“Everyday use, Fancy, Guest, Fancy guest…”).

  • a miasma of incandescent plasma

    I’m withholding judgment until I hear what George Will has to say.

  • pocketnerd

    And, of course, crimes against women don’t count as much. I mean, it’s not like Samuel Curtis Johnson III sexually assaulted a fellow wealthy man. The outcome might have been very different if he had.

    But I’m beginning to wonder when we’ll see a defense lawyer in a case like this argue society shouldn’t imprison the mega-rich because JOB CREATORS.

  • sugarfrosted

    @4,

    So what happens if a rich guys says, “If I’m convicted and have to go to prison, I’ll have to shut down my company and put a lot of the people in this town out of work.” because that seems to be what happened here.

    That might be an issue if it was some medium to lower side of big business and he had any real decision making power in the company, but SC Johnson is so big that it probably wouldn’t have even caused a minor hiccup even if he was the CEO. Also he’s just the heir I don’t think he has any actual standing in the company other than maybe and investor with possible a lot of stock.

  • Trebuchet

    I don’t think “SC Johnson” is the same as “Johnson and Johnson.”

    Correct. It bugs the heck out of me when Ed does this kind of stuff, and he does it far too often.

    S.C. Johnson loves to advertise itself as “a family company.” For some values of “family”, I guess.

  • smrnda

    On the effects of putting this ‘job creator’ in jail – a solution could be to pass the ownership of the business to the employees and leave them to work out ‘leadership’ issues. Most heads, particularly ones which inherited their position, are probably mostly figureheads and have no real purpose other than sucking up money.

  • alexmcdonald

    “If I’m convicted and have to go to prison, I’ll have to shut down my company and put a lot of the people in this town out of work.”

    No, you will be convicted and go to prison. The company will continue without you; the shares will be assigned to the state in recompense to the people that made you wealthy and that trusted you. Some will be paid to your victim for their suffering. All of us will manage without a rapist in charge.

  • flex

    So what happens if a rich guys says, “If I’m convicted and have to go to prison, I’ll have to shut down my company and put a lot of the people in this town out of work.” because that seems to be what happened here.

    There is no company which cannot replace personnel, including the CEO. He does not need to shut his company down, he needs to appoint another manager. If he does shut his company down he is doing it solely in retaliation.

    That statement is a threat and the courts should add additional time to his sentence for making it.

    Not that they will.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Alverant “So what happens if a rich guys says, “If I’m convicted and have to go to prison, I’ll have to shut down my company and put a lot of the people in this town out of work.” because that seems to be what happened here.”

    “I got a nice company here. It’d be a pity if something were to…happen…to it.”

  • sugarfrosted

    @11 It is weird that this reasoning never works when it’s a highly skilled worker with specialized training, because often these people are way harder to replace than a CEO. Also there is an element of truth to that with a small manufacture, clearly not with SC Johnson, though.

  • http://polrant@blogspot.com democommie

    Well, at least Mr. Johnson, the sap of his family tree will have plenty of material to sample while he’s busy “waxin’ the dolphin.”.

  • busterggi

    Walsh: “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown.”

    The whole world is Chinatown.

  • Alverant

    So a company owner can’t shut down operations in a town out of spite for a conviction of themselves or a family member and that the government can step in and seize control of their property upon conviction?

  • Richard Smith

    SC Johnson: a dysfunctional family company.

  • colnago80

    According to Wiki, the CEO of the company is one Herbert Fisk Johnson III.

  • colnago80

    According to Wiki, the company is rated one of the best enterprises in the US to work for and has been given awards for and has been rated one of the 10 best companies for working mothers to work for.

    Despite the deprivations of Mr. Johnson, this appears to be a pretty decent outfit.

    By he way, Fisk has a PhD in physics from Cornell so he ain’t no dummy.

  • Pingback: See?! Rich People Really Do Go to Jail Sometimes. | Foster Disbelief()

  • gog

    I think he’d fare alright in prison. A nice 8×6 concrete-and-steel number suits him just fine.

  • fusilier

    Wisconsin has a draconian sting operation in place to catch on-line sexual predators.

    One fairly young man I know is doing 5 years in a medium security prison. He got picked up in Racine, of all places, after scheduling a meeting with some girl he was told was 16.

    A middle-school teacher (I know him from church) here in Indianapolis was caught and transported to Milwaukee for trial. I guess there was no room in the inn, since he was sentenced to a $5,000 fine, not prison.

    Both individuals, of course, are on the Internet Sexual Predator lists, forever.

    _._._._

    If you’re rich, you can get away with anything; cf. Jim Irsay and his drug arrests.

    fusilier

    James 2:24

  • Trebuchet

    According to Wiki, the CEO of the company is one Herbert Fisk Johnson III.

    Presumably the pervert’s older, and hopefully wiser, brother.

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    who confessed to repeatedly sexually assaulting his teenage stepdaughter

    received a four-month jail sentence on Friday from a Racine, WI judge who cited the Johnson family’s importance in the community.

    I hate the “sexually assault” terminology. It can mean anything from thigh-rubbing to rape. But to whatever unspecified degree this maggot “repeatedly sexually assaulted” this child, months in jail is an insult to civilised sensibility, his family’s importance in the community being absolutely irrelevant.

    For her, it’s nothing like 4 months and it’s over. This will haunt her in a PTSD kind of way for the rest of her life.

    But, sure, since the maggot has big money, trashing this kid is not so bad in the bigger picture of things.

  • https://www.facebook.com/charlie.crumling Charlie Crumling

    The American justice system: guilty until proven rich.