NYPD Beat the Hell Out of Man — On Video

Here’s a textbook example of how so many instances of police brutality go. A man is searched for a clearly trumped up reason — they claim they were responding to a “noise complaint” — then is arrested for asking why he was searched. When he asks why he’s being arrested, he’s beaten repeatedly by a gang of officers. And it’s on video.

He was arrested for disorderly conduct and resisting what was clearly an illegal arrest (and an illegal search in the first place). The case was so weak that the DA refused to prosecute and dropped the charges. This is standard operating procedure. In nearly every case of police brutality, they charge the victim with those two catch-all charges. The NYPD internal affairs department is now investigating, but I’m not holding my breath waiting for justice to be done. It rarely is.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    With NYPD (and the Seattle police, and apparently most urban police departments), Internal Affairs means keeping shit like this out of the news and out of the court rooms. You know, internal.

  • http://www.thelosersleague.com theschwa

    The New Professionalism continues to run rampant keep us safe…

  • LightningRose

    It’s too bad there wasn’t a “good guy with a gun” on the scene.

  • gog

    At one point you had the chance to put your hands behind your back. Why didn’t you do that?

    The reaction I would want to give to that reporter is “fuck you, you fucking bullshit question-asking motherfucker.” Why didn’t he put his hands behind his back? Because the officer came up and slapped cuffs on him. That’s not a fucking arrest. The way it looks, there was no order of arrest given, no actual opportunity to comply with any sort of physical restraint. A moment of confusion–a moment of “what the fuck is happening here; what did I do?” turns into a beatdown by uniformed thugs–again.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    … I’m not holding my breath waiting for justice to be done. It rarely is.

    The beatee’s multi-million dollar lawsuit (clearly impending) might help somewhat with that.

  • http://www.facebook.com/eo.raptor.3 eoraptor

    The beatee’s multi-million dollar lawsuit (clearly impending) might help somewhat with that.

    Naah. The city will settle for some undisclosed, but hopefully fairly hefty, amount but deny any wrong-doing. In the meantime, the beaters are the heros of their precincts, receive nothing worse than a slap on the wrist with an over-boiled noodle, and return to street duty with no lessons learned by anybody… Except for Mr. Santiago who likely has learned that being on the street, in broad daylight, while black, is a crime of some sort.

  • http://www.facebook.com/eo.raptor.3 eoraptor

    Oh, and one other thing, how does quietly standing on the street justify any search?

  • D. C. Sessions

    eoraptor, he looked suspicious. Darkly suspicious.

  • smrnda

    I think that the following laws should be revoke:

    resisting arrest should be legal. the cops should be expected to take a few punches to the face or maybe a bite or two without hitting back, and if they can’t do that , they can quit the force. public safety ALWAYS over officer safety. otherwise, any claims they put themselves on the line for the public is false .

    disorderly conduct should not apply in any conflict between citizens and police.

  • D. C. Sessions

    smrnda, I’d settle for removing the presumption of police impartiality in conflicts between citizens and police.

  • lakitha tolbert

    I’m grateful to you guys for getting me to laugh about this shit.

    @3 Lighteningrose: I think the problem there is there were too many guys with guns present. Although I like the idea that this kind of behavior should be dangerous for cops, on the front end if not the back.

  • EnlightenmentLiberal

    “The beatee’s multi-million dollar lawsuit (clearly impending) might help somewhat with that.”

    Naah. The city will settle for some undisclosed, but hopefully fairly hefty, amount but deny any wrong-doing.

    That’s assuming a lot. That’s assuming the guy will win.

    Also, the problem is the lack of personal responsibility and lack of personal accountability. The city shouldn’t pay. The specific officers should be put up on criminal charges. That’s the only way to stop this bullshit. Change the incentives for the individual cops.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Also, the problem is the lack of personal responsibility and lack of personal accountability.

    Dude, look at the video again — there was more than one cop. It was a COLLECTIVE action. And if the city is refusing to properly train its cops, or discipline them when they screw up like this, then it’s the city, not just “a few bad apples,” who are responsible for incidents like this.

    I’m all in favor of holding individual cops accountable for their actions — they do have a lot of discretion on the street — but pretending the jurisdictions they serve shouldn’t pay, is not at all fair or just. They need incentives to behave too.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=597316935 ashleybell

    Fire ALL police officers Everywhere, then have them re-apply for their jobs and their applications be assessed by an independent hiring contractor. Add a battery of psychological tests and hiring agencies access to all of the officer’s previous files…

  • Crimson Clupeidae

    I would like to see every lawsuit like this in the future pursued with something like the following:

    “My client is sueing $XXX million, but is willing to reduce that by $XXX for each officer present that participated in this action that is fired from the force with a note for the reason they were fired. I will reduce the asked for claim and additional $XXX if the DA presses charges. ”

    This would hopefully get the message out, and keep the thugs out of uniform for a while.

  • EnlightenmentLiberal

    but pretending the jurisdictions they serve shouldn’t pay, is not at all fair or just. They need incentives to behave too.

    I do not think this will be effective. It just hurts the taxpayers and the city. It will not translate into change for the city.

    You are operating under the assumption the city and police force give a damn about losing taxpayer money, that they care about the city itself. I think you are wrong here.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    I do not think this will be effective.

    On what grounds do you support accountability for some, but not for others?

    And what better alternative do you have to offer?

  • wilsim

    Police not only need to be personally responsible for abuses like this, they need to be collectively responsible, because otherwise there is no incentive to police their own.

    I suggest that settlements should be paid out of the police’s general pension fund.

  • EnlightenmentLiberal

    @Raging Bee

    I support accountability for those people who actually shoot other people unjustifiably. I believe that merely winning a settlement against a police department is less likely to produce good results than throwing individual cops in jail. I agree that merely throwing individual cops in jail may not be enough. I agree with also targeting the policies and training of cops. I still want personal accountability when you shoot someone.